Spotlight Story Program: Meet Caitlyn Fulton

Meet Caitlyn Fulton

Growing up in Scotland with cerebral palsy, Caitlyn Fulton has challenged herself to not only become her biggest cheerleader for her daily life, but to take her hobbies and bring them into the forefront of the work and activism she does. Having studied music in university and being a model, Caitlyn is constantly free in using media and art to break stigmas while also empowering other young people that they can find their inner strength in the things they love to do. While Caitlyn’s CP doesn’t define her, it gives her a lens to tackle life and achieve her goals, and we’re proud that she’s a GBL-All Star in Caitlyn’s second year working with InvisiYouth in our leadership program! Caitlyn gives so much good advice your young adults to finds ways to enjoy life even in those medical settings, and how to have your chronic illness/disability be not your sole identifier but one of the traits that make you unique!

Hi! My name is Caitlyn, I’m 20 from Scotland. I was born premature and as a result was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy. CP is a neurological condition which is caused by damage to the brain. For me, CP effects my balance and coordination.

I’ve used my health journey in my work by exploring the things I love, like my passion for music. I studied it at Diploma level [in university], and alongside music as a whole, I’m a vocalist at heart and love to sing. I can just be me and not think of my condition; it’s a freeing feeling of enjoyment too.

Secondly, I’ve used my health journey to inspire others by becoming a model—signed with Zebedee Talent—breaking down the barriers and stigmas about disability that the fashion and media industry hold.

It allows me to challenge stigmas on disability and raising awareness of disabled people in wheelchairs specifically by being seen in a positive light and that’s what I’m aiming for! There’s still a long way to go for the industry to be completely inclusive but in the last couple of years there’s been a real positive change within – step/wheel in the right direction.

I also play Boccia (a Paralympic sport) with a recognised team in Glasgow as part of Scottish Disability Sport. By doing so, not only am I raising awareness of disability but also women in sport too as it’s a rather male-dominated field.

Writing/blogging is recent addition but I like writing about topics that are important to me, such as disability rights and my hobbies which hopefully resonates with other young people as it’s great for them to know others out there like myself feel the same way as them. Through my health journey, I’ve grown in knowing I shouldn’t feel bad for having Cerebral Palsy. It makes me who I am, though it doesn’t define me. I wouldn’t be the person I am today if I was non-disabled and I don’t know if I would want to be a totally different person – I’m happy being in the skin I’m in because I’m unique.

I’ve found ways to support others by sharing similar experiences and being a source of encouragement that while yes, life throws a lot of challenges, I always tackle them head on and think there’s always a reason why. I’m a true believer in the phrase, “things happen for a reason’.”

It’s been great having support groups too, connecting with others who have the same conditions and interests as myself. Social media is certainly a great tool to connect and interact. Especially with the likes of InvisiYouth, it’s been brilliant being part of such a great organisation and connecting with other young people worldwide.

When I look at my experiences in medical settings, there’s things I’ve learned that I’d love to share with others to improve their experiences. Even if it’s your first appointment in a new hospital where you’ve been referred for treatment, changing consultants or moving up from child to adult services -I know how daunting all of this can be as I’ve experienced it first hand – become familiar with your surroundings, get to know the nurses/staff who’ll be caring for you if its procedure-related.

Also bring home comforts, items that make you feel calm.

Whenever I went in for operations knowing it would be a good few weeks before going home, it helped knowing who the team members were that would have me in their care and over time there’s a bond that’s created. It’s bittersweet going home, I always felt sad saying goodbye when it was time to go yet it was a great feeling to know I was on the right track and made great progress.

In your daily life, know that your condition doesn’t defy you. Yes, it’s part of you but your worth so much more with the interests you have, outlays that shaped you, make you who you are. Dealing with my health has shaped me in knowing that I’ll experience many hurdles in life but I’ll always get through them no matter what. As I’ve gotten older I don’t feel embarrassed about having a disability and now I embrace it—it’s my superpower and I have a story to tell.

My main message: There will be good and bad days but know that your condition makes you who you are. Strive to be the best version of yourself, make the most of it.

I always say to myself ‘I was given this life because I was strong enough to live it’: strong enough to the face the battles that come my way and cherish the moments in live that are to be remembered. Look your bad days in the eye and know you’ll overcome them, maybe not tomorrow or the next day but you will achieve. Whenever you feel good in yourself, you can get through it all and survived another day, that’s what I tell myself and you should too – be proud!

And the Total is in! InvisiYouth’s Charity Teams for England’s Superhero Disability Triathlon Raised a Total of…

By Dominique Viel

September 8, 2017

After months of fundraising, campaigning with family and friends and online through our GoFundMe Page, InvisiYouth’s Charity Teams that participated in England’s first inclusive disability adaptive triathlon have ended their fundraisers.

We received donations online and donations in the mail and on our website’s donate page too! We are happy to announce that our Charity Teams fundraised a grand total of $1,000!

All these funds are going directly into building InvisiYouth’s new illness management tools and programs that will give back to so many teens and young adults with chronic illnesses.

These tools and programs will be unique, showing a wide older youth illness and disability community all the life hacks and tips to navigate life while living with illness, or as we call it, the non-medical side to medial experiences. 100% these donations are going to help build them!

Each of our teams competed in three sports at the Olympic Dorney Lake in Windsor, England: swimming, running and cycling.  Different teams of people with disabilities and chronic illnesses came out from across the country, along with their supporters of friends and family (and sometimes dogs too), all who worked together to complete these events.

InvisiYouth Charity loves supporting disability sports and the way adaptive athletics can play such a critical role in the life of a teen and young adult living with chronic illness and disability.

It is a way to get them back into a routine, physical therapy, and teamwork mentality. It is a powerful force that needs more attention and support group to it!

Our teams consisted of lifelong friends, and competitive athletes in university, supporting their friend with a rare disease. Another team was filled with family members and siblings.

And we even had a married couple that are passionate physiotherapists and exercise therapists who want to work with InvisiYouth to train and bring adaptive sports to more older youth across England.

One InvisiYouth Team member, 21-year-old university student Katy Baker, felt the benefits of being part of Superhero Series Triathlon.

“[The Superhero Tri] proved that people like me, with chronic illness, can take part in sports with their family and friends,” said Baker. 

Watching our teams cross the finish line at the Superhero Triathlon was unlike anything we could have experienced. So much joy and excitement from accomplishing their goal, and watching all the other youth, families, friends and supporters crossing the finish line and earning their medal.

It is clear to say that anyone can get so motivated watching such a strong group of people competing in all types of sport!

Now…InvisiYouth Charity is happy to announce that we will also be part of the next Superhero Series event, the Winter WonderWheels on December 3rd at Dorney Lake once again!  This will be a massively festive disability adaptive sporting event where anyone can cycle, walk, run, push/be pushed around Dorney Lake for different distance challenges: 1km, 5km or 10km!

AND WE NEED YOU TO JOIN OUR TEAMS!

We want to have a full set of teams so if you want to compete with friends and family FOR FREE, contact us, and we will sign you up for a fun and festive event to end 2017! 

Spotlight Story Program: Louise’s Story

Meet Louise Cooper

We’ve gotten to know Louise first as one of the cool British health and lifestyle bloggers that followed InvisiYouth, but we are getting to know her even better as a member of the InvisiYouth team for this winter’s Superhero Series Winter Games this December!  She’s an Ehlers Danlos Syndrome warrior that’s found ways to balance her love of sport and travel with her illnesses, and her open honestly makes her one to watch in our book.

My name is Louise, I’m originally from Essex, England. I was diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, PoTS, Chiari and a whole host of other conditions in 2015 and am still under investigation for a variety of things!

I have always been a “sporty” person, I didn’t find out about my EDS (a connective tissue disorder that can affect the skin, joints, muscles and vascular system with hyper-mobility and hyperelasticity) until three years ago when I was 25, but have been in and out of hospital my whole life and had a back brace for scoliosis at the age of 12 for a few years. The only time I didn’t have to wear my back brace was when I was exercising, so, if there was a sport – I did it! I was also a competitive swimmer throughout my teens, I even made it to nationals (albeit in a relay team by HEY, it still counts!). Unfortunately, after various immune issues and bouts of glandular fever and CMV my exercise started to tail off in my late teens and early 20s.

I held down a full-time job for 5 years, bought my own apartment and car, I had everything I needed! Things came to a head around 18 months ago and my body just said ENOUGH, I was working ridiculous hours at a job in London with the commute, and not looking after myself much. The average person would burn out, let alone someone with a chronic illness, but I guess that’s just the fight in me.

So I started back with physio, some days I’m fine, some days I’m not! I like someone who gives me physio exercises based around the gym – I just respond better that way, I like to be challenged and push myself further however it is SO important to do this correctly and under supervision. Physio will always be a part of my life as I will always have ups and downs in my health but I dont see this as a negative, I learn each time what I can do to strengthen or protect my body in order to prevent or minimize thedisruptionto my body for the next time.

I have found it’s important to use supports, straps and anything else for your physio exercises and gym routines. This will always give you the confidence to know you are safe while exercising! I currently wear, finger, x 2 wrist, knee and back supports when working out. While there’s not an awful lot I can do about my ligaments and tendons, I can strengthen and tone the muscles around my body to get them performing as best as possible! Being back in the gym the last two years hasn’t always been easy. I’ve a fair share of blips along the way with disc tears, bulges and tarlov cysts now appearing, but this has only made me more determined to keep going! Keeping mobile and active reduces my pain, but there is a very careful balance, I have to make sure I dont overdo it and listen to my body!

I also have to make sure that I listen to my health not just through exercise, but through my diet and medications as well.

By health, I mean nutrition, taking my tablets and everything in between. I’ve always had food intolerances, but recently these have become a lot worse. I don’t believe in cutting out EVERYTHING from your diet, it’s everything in moderation and finding out what works for you.

My motto is – listen to yourself. I find my body tells me what I need but generally, I’ll eat meat, fresh veg and a small portion of carbs. Its about trial and error and finding what works for you, and you really, really do have to persevere, it won’t change in a week, it has to be a lifestyle change in order for it to work.

Possibly most importantly – Take your medication!! They are prescribed for a reason – and I know this can be hard, I am forgetful, this is something I’ve really had to work on! It sounds SO easy and its not that I don’t want to take them it just becomes – I’ll do it in a minute! How do I manage it now? I leave my tablets in my room and kitchen, if there staring at me, I can’t avoid them!

When living with chronic illness, it not only can take a toll on your physical health but also your mental health. My mental health impacts on my ability to participate in my exercise plans and my dietary programs. If I am feeling pessimistic (which we are all entitled to at times) or having a bad day, I am less likely to want to go to the gym or look after myself as well or cook my dinner.

Now this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, nobody in the world is 100% positive all day everyday, but for the most part, I think it is important to have a Positive Mental Attitude (PMA). Even on my bad days, I always try and find a positive. For this reason, I usually have flowers around the house – if I can’t think of anything else nice about my day or if I’m feeling low, I can always look at flowers to give me a “pick me up.”  Negative thoughts cannot change what has happened or the current situation you may be in or what your future may hold. But, what can change it? Trying.

Trying everything, and anything thrown your way.

I moved/travelled to New Zealand, started promotional modeling, made a great group of friends, went on adventures, hiked 4 hours in a bush, appeared on TV (albeit an extra!), my health was the best it had ever been! I’ve recently started a forum along with some Chronic Illness friends and we will be uploading beginners home workouts and basic physio (all are qualified, I will just be performing the routines).

But one day I woke up unable to move and spent the next 2-3 weeks in and out of hospital and have since, pack up my room and sold my furniture in New Zealand and returned to Essex to give my best chance of recover and further testing on what we believe may be neurological.

One thing that I’ve always found incredibly hard – and still do – is I look totally “normal”. I don’t have a cast on my leg or have visible scars so I often hear the phrase “but you don’t look sick”. I’m quite open about my health and try and raise as much awareness as possible, by posting “normal” pictures and trying to change the way illnesses are perceived – just because you can’t see it, doesn’t mean it’s not there!

Am I nervous, anxious and scared? Of course! But I’ll keep trying and determined to keep going, if I’ve learnt anything its that were a lot stronger than we realize and give ourselves credit for.

That is why I’m so appreciative of being asked by InvisiYouth to be a part of their Charity Team for this past Superhero Series Triathlon for disability adaptive sports.  And while I couldn’t compete that day, I am thrilled to be part of the new InvisiYouth Charity Team for the upcoming Superhero Series Event this December, Superhero Winter Games. The work they do is very close to my heart and something I’m so passionate about – I wish I would have had this connection to the community in my teens – before the days of social media!! I cannot wait to support InvisiYouth in the Superhero Winter Games run and hopefully raise a bit of awareness too!