Spotlight Story Program: Katy’s Story

Meet Katy Baker

Since before she can remember, Katy has been part of the healthcare system dealing with a congenital heart defect called Scimitar Syndrome. But what has defined her medical life has not defined Katy’s personal life.  She’s a university student, on a competitive trampoline team, and rare disease activist that’s using her voice to make a positive difference.

At 3 months old, I was diagnosed with Scimitar Syndrome, a congenital heart defect which also means I only have one functioning lung.

Since then, I have had lots of tests, consultations and been under the care of different hospitals all which I continue to go all through this today.

As I became a young adult in the hospital system, I have now moved to a different hospital, had a new consultant and had more emergency hospital visits which meant needing more tests and observations.

I first moved to a different hospital when I transitioned from pediatric to adult hospital services. I had to get used to knowing my way round a new hospital, the new tests I had to do and get to know my new doctors. And my health still correlated with my life as a young person. 

When I moved to University, this meant signing up to a new general physician surgery where they did not know what my condition was, and even experience going to the emergency room in a hospital I did not know.

From my perspective, being a child or teen in pediatric medical care means that you normally have the same hospital consultant over the period of about 16 or 17 years, or whenever you transition to adult services.

In pediatrics, you are used to the same environment and over time you feel settled, not because you’re in a hospital but because it’s somewhere you’ve got to know and somewhere you know you’re going to be cared for. Being a teen in pediatric medical care is unique because you still have the support from your family and there is no pressure when it comes to whether they are there for your appointments or not. Teenagers who are chronically ill often have to grow up more quickly to understand everything that is going on but they are still children and still need support from others.

Being a teen patient to me is different than being a child patient or an adult patient because as a teenager, you are exposed to a lot more in your life but at the same time, you are going through some other transitions which teenagers can often find difficult.

However, when you’re a child, you are often more dependent on your family and they might not be aware what is going on which in a way is an advantage because as a teenager, you often have more awareness of what you are going through and your illness which can be really difficult not only for your physical but also mental health.

Having to be in hospital as a teenager can be really difficult because of everything else you are going through at the same time in your life outside of your health. But I think that one of the most important things to do is ask for support when you need. Whether the support is a family member, a friend or someone else, having support while in hospital or with a chronic illness can often be useful.

I think teenagers in hospital would benefit from introductions and more information earlier about the transition process into adult health services. Young people often move to adult services when they are from between 14-18 years old and so new environments can seem quite overwhelming. Therefore, introductions and information about the adult services should be in place.

Dealing with my health has been really challenging, however there have also been some benefits because it has shaped me in to who I am today. I created a film last year with a charity about how my condition does not stop me from being part of my University’s trampolining team. Since then, I was in two newspapers, on a local radio station and now being given lots of opportunities to spread my story. I was even invited to speak at a Rare Disease Day event this year, which was such a great experience.

I am also really excited to participate in the Superhero Series disability adaptive sport event this August in England as part of InvisiYouth’s Charity Friends team to show that people with disabilities or illnesses can still achieve like everyone else.

Dealing with my health has taught me to not take life for granted and to take every opportunity that comes my way. 

In the future, I want to complete my Childhood and Youth degree, do a master’s degree and have a career working with children and young people in a hospital.

For me, it’s as if my life will be going full circle from my personal experiences and professional future.

What’s In My Bag: The “Boss Lady” Spoonie Edition

March 31, 2017

It’s often so hard to travel on a daily basis as a spoonie, let alone make sure that you have everything you need in order to adapt and function to your health struggles each and every day…Even harder, not to feel the need to carry a massive duffle bag everywhere you go!

For a long time, I’m always asked what are my essentials, my go-to tools and gadgets that I always carry with me, the “spoonie boss lady necessities” as one of our InvisiYouth supporters wrote to me.

So, it seemed about time that I finally reveal what I carry in my bag me, my own personal “What’s in my Bag” segment of this founder’s blog, but it’ll be the boss lady edition with a RSD-inflicted flare.

 

What’s typically in my bag is a range of products:

  1. Precut KT Tape
  2. Hand warmers
  3. Mini Tylenol bottle
  4. Bandage dispenser
  5. Notepad
  6. Pens with multiple sizes
  7. Calendar with to-do list
  8. Portable charger
  9. Business cards
  10. Tea
  11. Sunglasses
  12. Mini lavender lotion
  13. Phone
  14. Motivational quote

Besides the typical license and money additions that are always in any bag I take, I can break down the items I carry with me into three categories: my mini-medical toolkit, my boss girl life and my random necessities.

When it comes to my mini-medical toolkit, I bring the most compact versions of everything that I need with me. Since I have residual RSD, my needs are more for pain management and reduction of muscular swelling and spasms. I have to sort of premeditate what are the possible injuries and flare-ups that can happen during and typically for me, these are the main helpers to get me through the day to keep pushing forward.

I ALWAYS carry hand warmers on me!  They are a literal piece of heaven that can lower my pain super quickly. When it is cold out, or my limbs are freezing up, or my muscles lock up and I cannot move my hand or foot, I rip open the bag and let the warmth take over.  It has always given me a bit of solace to have the warmth.  Next, I bring precut strips of KT Tape.  This is amazing for the swelling and nerve pain that I have on a constant basis, especially when it spikes from overuse or injury.  I wear different patterns to reduce swelling and allow me to move my hand or foot more easily.  With it being precut, all I have to do is stick and apply!

The natural medical necessity is to make sure to carry a pain reliever like a mini Tylenol bottle, and while RSD nerve pain doesn’t improve with any ibuprofen, it helps with the natural side effects that come along with RSD for the rest of my body.  Muscle stiffness, soreness from overusing my right side to compensate, migraines that only affect my left side of my head…this mini Tylenol bottle is a must-have to get through the day.  Last, but definitely not least is the bandage dispenser (which is InvisiYouth merchandise with our logo!!).  While odd for RSD spoonies, you have to look at the side effects that happen with nerve damage.  When my hand spasms and I drop things, or my foot goes numb temporarily and I trip, minor injuries can happen and a Band-Aid is a definite necessity.

My next group of items that are always in my purse will help out my daily life as a boss…that is a charity founder boss. The most obvious thing I carry with me is my cell phone.  Whether it’s checking in on our social media accounts, responding to emails, or marking out reminders through our calendar…my phone has become more of an electronic personal assistant instead of the device I use to call or text.  But I cannot always rely on my phone to remember everything, and that is why I carry a mini calendar with a to-do list in my bag.  It is so important for me as a charity owner to remember all of my appointments, conference calls, Skype meetings and project deadlines so a calendar is vital to InvisiYouth consistent momentum forward.  And for each week, I keep a to-do list so I can cross off the different tasks at hand for the week; it keeps me on task, while also helping me remember what I need to do!

Next up is a notepad that is small and compact, with lots of blank pages. With the natural brain fog that unfortunately plagues my day as an RSD side-effect, I have a hard time remembering all the different ideas and moments of inspiration that come my way throughout the day.  Want to remember a new charity or company to contact for collaboration or fiscal sponsorship? Hear a teen that wants to work with us on advocacy?  Think of a new founder’s blog topic?  I keep a notepad to help me remember all the ideas that pop into my brain and prevent them from being forgotten.  But to write down in my calendar or notepad means I need to carry pens (hope you like our InvisiYouth merchandise specialized, and recycled material, pens!!) in my bag.  To help with my nerve damage, I always carry pens and pencils that are different sizes, some super thin, other jumbo-kindergartener sized.  This helps because oftentimes my grip changes each day with swelling and muscular pain/stiffness so it helps to always walk into meetings with multiple pens so no matter how I’m feeling, I can find one that will fit my grip in that moment.  And last, but definitely not least…you CANNOT be a boss lady without carrying a bunch of your own business cards!  It’s required, and needed, and honestly, there is a silent power that comes along with handing over that card for work!

The last bunch of items I keep in my purse all seem super random to most people, but somehow no matter how many times I clean out my bad, they end up in every bag. First off…obviously since I mentioned my overuse of my cell phone, it is only obvious that I would bring a portable charger with me as well.  I have to make sure that this phone is constantly charged and ready to use, and this portable charger is small and sleek to fit with in a clutch or massive duffle bag. Next, I always bring a mini lotion with me in my bag, but not just any lotion.  I always bring either a lavender lotion (my favorite is L’occitane Lavender hand cream) or I bring a eucalyptus-blended lotion (something like aromatherapy eucalyptus spearmint from Bath and Body Works). For me, the scent of lavender is a quick stress relief so if I’m every feeling stressed or anxious, I rub on some lavender lotion and the aromatic scent brings a quick level of ease.

Along that line of helping with stress, I usually carry a tea bag with me in all my bag.  In a lot of meetings that I go to, they usually ask if I want some coffee, tea or water to drink, and while I ADORE coffee, you want to stay nice and calm, not shaking from too much caffeine, especially if you have meetings all day long. There are dozens of flavors you can have (just like my chamomile flavor from Stash) and you can typically get hot water in most delicatessens or coffee houses so it’s a go-to in any scenario. Next, I will almost always carry a pair of sunglasses with me because with having residual RSD in the left side of my next and head, I can get spontaneous migraines that afflict only the left side of my head, and that can make me sensitive to the light. To prevent me having any problems going to work, or hanging out with friends, I have sunglasses to dim the brightness.  And if that means I need to be ‘that girl’ who wears her shades indoors…well I will be that person on occasion for the sake of my health.  Last, but certainly not least, I like to carry a motivational quote with me wherever I go.  Usually I have an inspiring quote engraved on a rock, like my favorite quote “This Too Shall Pass” that slips into any purse pocket.  It’s small, but just this little thing can give me that mental push to keep going when the work load piles up or my health starts to stumble.

What I carry is not just assisting me or improving my quality of life, but it’s simply empowering. By having all of this in my bag, I empower my life and the woman, the charity owner, the spoonie that I am because I take control of each choice in this very small part of my life.

It is my actions and my decisions on what to bring that motivate me because I hold all the power in what I bring which will help me during the day to make sure I can strong and achieve my daily goals.

 

~Dominique