Spotlight Story Program: Meet Isabella McCray

Letting go of the illusion, and fully embracing the life you’re living now. That’s a prime mindset InvisiYouth advocates through its programs, and it’s a focal point of our latest Spotlight Story Program feature writer’s daily life. Say hello to the American stellar teen, Isabella McCray, who has not only celebrated a high school AND Associates degree graduation this month, but uses her platform to raise awareness of the chronic illness she lives with, Lupus. This autoimmune disease is life-altering, and since her pre-teens into her later teen years Isabella has needed to balance her health changes with her life changes. Isabella’s journey with Lupus shares her vulnerable strength and how her reclaimed her bravery through her flare-ups, even embracing the pains to live life at its fullest. Now with eyes set on being a pediatric nurse, Isabella is allowing her voice to encourage community connectivity and support, while sharing what it’s like living and managing Lupus. And with May being Lupus Awareness Month, we knew having Isabella share her story would educate and empower many other teens in the Lupus and autoimmune disease community! 

Hi, my name is Isabella McCray and I am a chronic illness and Lupus advocate, inspiring and encouraging young adults like me! I use my platform to talk about all things chronic illness and spread the word about what it’s like living and managing Lupus.

When I was little, I went to preschool and my teacher used to always rub and massage my legs because my legs were always sore. Eventually, it became difficult to run and play, to climb stairs, and if I had exposure to sunlight/heat, I would break out in hives.

I went to my pediatrician and she diagnosed me with growing pains.

Fast forward 2014, I saw visibly swollen glands and I visited my pediatrician again and she referred me to an ENT doctor. He discovered in my blood some abnormalities and referred me to my present pediatric rheumatologist. He ordered various blood tests and on my next visit with him, I was diagnosed with Lupus SLE.

I recall searching what it was and reading about the symptoms. I experienced each of them. Joint pain, headaches, fatigue, butterfly rash, hair loss, etc. I was just 11 when I was diagnosed with Lupus. I was a young child and I didn’t know how to feel or how to accept my diagnosis. I also didn’t know that my life would change forever.

In the years following, I learned to managed my chronic illness; that had no cure. My classmates didn’t know because I didn’t want them to view me differently. However, it was the year 2017  when my journey crossed and I discovered new bravery for every aspect of my life. I had my first flare-up; I was home-bound from school for 5 months, and the most time I was admitted in the hospital being 2 weeks. I had to tell my peers about my condition because of my absences. It was at that point that I was at my lowest.

I didn’t have the bravery I held when I was little. I was in unbearable pain and I was hopeless of things getting better. I started losing my hair, which was 14 inches long and my appearance changed. I consulted with a chronic illness hairstylist, who specialized in haircuts for Lupus patients. I had dreadlocks since I was 4 years old and getting them cut, I felt like I lost one of the most important parts of what made me.

In light of my insecurities and challenges, I decided to cut my hair.  I immediately made adjustments to my schedule and my classifications with my peers.

This did not sit well with some and I was subjected to bullying. I experienced emotional, physical, and mental pain but I never gave up. It wasn’t that giving up was an option because it was.

However, I didn’t let the pain and suffering I endured break me. Instead, I started embracing the pain and turning it into strength and inspiration.

Experiencing a life-changing illness that changes your outlook on everything is stressful and overwhelming. That is why I use my voice to bring awareness to chronic illnesses and inspire others in this community to hold on and if you feel like giving up, you have a whole community to back you up.

Despite our limitations, we can develop patience and discover hope in the worst of situations. Because battling a life-altering illness is a tough journey and changing directions in life is not a bad decision. It just allows you to change your story and experience the high and lows with an amazing support system on social media.

Being part of a community so empowering and influential, and it encouraged me to share my voice and interact with others. I have grown and matured to know my worth and who I am, personally. I am compassionate, caring, sweet, understanding, and forgiving! I experienced so many things in my childhood that I should’ve experienced now being a young adult. I was such a private person growing up, but making my diagnoses public was one of the best decisions I made.

I had to face unknown experiences, having hope and strength and the mindset of coming out of these experiences even stronger. I became an advocate and not only for chronic illnesses, but also for my education as well.

I am currently a senior in high school, graduating with my high school diploma and Associates of Arts degree. Being afforded the opportunity of encountering many doctors and nurses on my various visits to the hospital inspired me to pursue and further my education in nursing to hopefully become a pediatric nurse.

During a visit with my specialist, my mom saw a pamphlet about Make-A-Wish Foundation. She reached out and contacted them about my journey and how far I’ve come and they wanted to have a meeting with my mom and I. Personally, whatever my wish was, I wanted to bring awareness to Lupus.  My Wish was to meet the cast of Good Morning America. Robin Roberts is an inspiring role model who I still admire today. My wish was granted, after several months, and it was an experience I will never forget!

Throughout my journey, I learned to let go of the illusion that it could have been different and understand my purpose now. It’s not every day you’re going to feel your best, and I can’t even count how many pep talks I have with my body every day to function and “get it together”!

The funny part is I’m still the same as before, I’m just diagnosed with a life-changing illness that presents challenges. I’m just stronger, wiser, more compassionate, and my sense of humor is a bit dark.

People manage their chronic illness differently, it’s whatever works for you. At the end of the day, you made it, and that itself is a victory. Know your limitations, enjoy life, take your medications, be yourself, and most of all, rest and breathe because you are here, now.