Spotlight Story Program: Meet Jasmine Chen

Perseverance, energy, adaptability, joy and wisdom. These are all traits we try to supply to all our young adults in the InvisiYouth community, and all perfect descriptors of our newest Spotlight Story Program feature writer, Jasmine Chen. From New Jersey, Jasmine is not your average 28 year old because she’s also a double lung transplant warrior after dealing with RSV. Her chronic illnesses have given her the life experiences to look at the world with such an empathetic and passionate lens. With her eagerness to improve her daily life, Jasmine has advocated not only for her physical health, but also her mental health, empowering others in the benefits of therapy too. We are so excited for you to read Jasmine’s story, and learn her five life lessons that you can easily apply in your daily life too.

My name is Jasmine, I am 28 years old from New Jersey and in July, I will be two years post- double lung transplant. Despite all the challenges of the past two years (and a pandemic to top it off), it was the best decision I ever made, and managing this condition constantly reminds me of what really matters in life:  family, friends, and finding purpose.

Every year, my birthday would come around, and every year, I would blow on my candles and wish for the same thing: to have healthy lungs.  My chronic health journey began when I was three: a doctor’s visit turned into a hospitalization of six weeks; while under the hospital’s care and observation for pneumonia, I caught RSV (Respiratory Syncytial Virus). As a young child, I was much more vulnerable to the virus, and the RSV ravaged through my lungs in a short period of time.  Even though I won the battle, the aftermath of permanently scarred lungs turned into an ongoing war.  I was a confusing and rare case, and the doctors tentatively diagnosed me with Bronchiolitis Obliterans.

When I entered my double-digit years, I graduated from oxygen dependency around the clock, and began physically attending school part-time.  Managing a depleted lung function on top of asthma and a defenseless immune system, my head was always calculating ways to save energy, maximize efficiency, and survive: I would gauge whether the energy spent trekking to my locker outweighed the expense of carrying around a heavy textbook.  My normal speed was a slower pace than the average student and I didn’t tend to have the breath to converse, and so I found myself walking alone a lot.

College made it more apparent that invisible illness was both a blessing and a curse.  Being able to blend in with the crowd around campus helped because it did not garner any unwanted attention.  On the other hand, I found myself often struggling to convince professors, friends, and people in general that I had a disability. A lack of visible proof resulted in many occasions where ignorance fed into a gaslighting culture and my imposter syndrome constantly minimized my suffering.

Dealing with society’s ignorance and treatment of my disability is on par, if not arguably worse, then managing the health struggles itself. 

For example, there were times I had to choose between my health and grades when a college professor refused to allow me to miss the final exam when I was ill.  There was the time HR called me in because an anonymous coworker reported me for “abusing” my handicap spot. Did I feel anger, resentment, and frustration when these situations happened?  Absolutely. Accepting that these things will happen and learning not to get stuck in it is a lifelong challenge.

Here are some of the things I would tell my younger self if I could:

#1: Learn to self-advocate. Over time, I learned to make my thoughts and concerns louder, whether that was dealing with coworkers, nurses and doctors, or insurance.  I used to believe the right way to be humble was by obediently following directions, and trusting those in charge, but eventually I realized it was important to be assertive and vocal while also doing your own research and thinking for yourself: it is possible to both retain humility and make your voice heard.

#2: Be gentle with yourself. You are more resilient than you think. People with chronic illnesses tend to experience the best and worst of life. Sometimes life throws curveballs at you, and many things are simply out of your control.  You will meet some unfriendly people, face complicated health issues, and have bad days. But you will also meet some amazing human beings, overcome those challenges, and have great days.

#3: Do not be afraid to seek help. Therapy is a lot like dating: when you meet the right one, it can be cathartic and life-changing. I built up the courage to overcome the stigma of therapy and sorted through several therapists before I found the right one. I began therapy during a dark period in college where I felt isolated, lost, and seriously wondered what the point of carrying on was. These sessions not only helped me navigate through the mental roller coaster of pre- and post- lung transplant, but also forced me to confront my own self-doubts and fears, ultimately empowering me to find and create the life I envision for myself (this will always be a work-in-progress).

#4: They are not a reflection of your self-worth. The level of your academics, the number of friends you have, and the experiences you may be deprived of are not your fault. You will meet various unique hurdles in life, whether they be people or circumstances. The amount of classes I missed, especially during the winter, was reflected in my grades.  There were friendships that died instantly or faded over time, whether they be because of betrayal, rejection, ignorance, or isolation.

Over time, this perpetuated a greater reluctance to disclose my health condition, for fear people would keep their distance once they knew.  But none of these difficult relationships or experiences define who you are or what your value is as a human being.

#5: You are the author, director, and CEO of your own identity. “She doesn’t like to mix negative and positive energy…”  This is a quote from one of my favorite movies, 50/50 (one of the few realistic movies that does not feed into an “inspiration porn” portrayal of illness).  Adam explains to his friend Kyle that his girlfriend has trouble dealing with the fact that he has cancer and refuses to mix her normal, able-bodied lifestyle (“positive energy”) with the “negative energy” of the hospital, which was a culmination of Adam’s illness and pain. For the longest time, I avoided using my handicap sign because I denied that I needed it.

I wanted one insignificant part of my life roaming the parking lots to be separate from my chronic illness life: instead, I gave myself the unnecessary burden of trying to live two identities.  But the truth is, I don’t have to choose between me who is ill and the parts of me that aren’t.  I am both.  I am just me: You are the only one who gets to define who you are. 

After some post-transplant complications, today I am at roughly 75% lung function as opposed to 16%.  I take a plethora of pills on a daily schedule, I get my blood drawn regularly, I converse frequently with my doctors and undergo whatever procedures are required, I have “moon-face” from steroids- occasionally, I argue with insurance.

But I am reborn in some sense, experiencing everything with new lungs and lung capacity I never had before.  I’ve learned to meditate and savor moments like when I’m safely at home, appreciating the silence and the privacy of my room- things I do not have when hospitalized.

Everything I’ve gone through has grown greater my empathy: I see the hidden pain in others’ eyes because I recognize it so clearly in my own.”- Melinda Means.

My first time hiking up three miles, first time walking up and down the stairs more than twice a day, and more recently, the first time dancing for a couple hours at one of my best friend’s weddings. Looking forward to many more first times.

 

Spotlight Story Program: Rachel Mayo’s Story

Meet Rachel Mayo

As a university freshman, Rachel was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, and it changed her way of way. But Rachel decided to take her new diagnosis and not just better her life, but motivate others with T1D to do the same. And she’s been doing that across the United States ever since. Plus…we’re thrilled Rachel will keep working with InvisiYouth as 2018 continues.

I grew up full of energy, always going from one thing to the next, without a need to hit the “slow down” button.

As a freshman in college, when it started to require more and more energy to do basic things, like walk to class, sit through class, even, I began to worry a little. Why did I need a three-hour nap after my 50-minute English class, when just months before, I was fine getting only 50 minutes of sleep every night?

“Worried” probably isn’t even the right word. I just noticed the difference. Since my mom worked for a general physician, I decided to get a general check-up. I figured my hormones were just out of whack, and as soon as I was relieved of the stress of my semester and moved back home for the summer, I would return to normal.

It’s no surprise that was not the cure for whatever was wrong with me. (That would make for an awfully boring story, don’t you think?) The day after my last final of my freshman year, I went to the doctor, and was told that if what they suspected was right, that there was no cure for whatever was wrong with me.

The next day, at 7:15 am, I went to see an endocrinologist, they drew blood, and after several anxiety-filled minutes of waiting, It was confirmed. I had Type 1 Diabetes (T1D).

There is no cure.

I would have to take insulin for the rest of my life.

I was mostly shocked.

Not necessarily angry, but I was sad. Confused. Full of questions. But for the most part, I was okay.

Three days later, I was at the mall with my mom and sister, and we had put our shopping on hold to refuel. (Eat lunch.)

At the food court, over my chicken sandwich and the Diet Coke I was still trying to learn to love, I broke down. I’m talking crocodile tears pouring down my face. I had every emotion running through my veins at that moment and I felt completely out of control.

That’s when I decided that the best way for me to deal with this disease would be to help other people deal with this disease. I had no idea what that looked like at the time, as I still had no idea how to handle my diagnosis. But I knew I could tackle it, and I knew I wanted to use it to help others.

Fast forward and I know what that looks like now. I have spent the last year traveling and speaking to different groups with T1D around the world, helping them to navigate this disease with a positive spirit.

I use social media to share pictures and videos of my life with T1D. I share my victories, my frustrations, and try my hardest to let others with T1D know they are not alone in what they go through.

I also love to educate those without T1D about the difficulties of living with this disease. Since T1D is an invisible illness, it is easy for others to overlook the constant inner battle we fight every day.

While this disease does not define me, it is a very big part of me, and has helped shape me into the person I am today. And if I may be so frank, I really like the person I am today. The person I am today is brave, even when it’s frightening, is adventurous, even when it takes work, and is gracious, even with herself.

But it took work to get there. What has helped me the most is using my story to help others. It is so therapeutic to lay down all of my battle scars for others to see and realize that they have friends who are in the trenches with them.

The community of people I have surrounded myself with has been crucial. I love getting on twitter and conversing with my #DOC (Diabetes Online Community) friends.

It’s like walking into my own special little T1D world where everyone is willing to give you advice when you need it, or just let you vent when you don’t. It’s not weird when I say “my blood sugar got so low my tongue went numb” or “I got a unicorn today!”

My T1D community has truly been life changing for me.

I don’t want it to sound like I have it all figured out and I am completely okay. I’m not. I get burned out. I get angry. I cry so hard I start to hyperventilate.

But that is okay. I have permission to do that, and once I figured that out, it got easier for me to get through those times. It’s okay to feel those things! But it’s not a healthy spot to set up camp.

What I want, more than anything, is for people with chronic illnesses, to understand that they can do anything. Absolutely anything. And YES it might be difficult, but it is so very worth it.

This past year alone I went skydiving, ran a half-marathon, visited 24 states, and five countries including UAE, Mexico, and three countries in Africa.

“I could never do that,” is what I heard from many of my T1D friends after every new adventure. It breaks my heart every time I hear that.

YES YOU CAN! There’s a strategy for everything, and there is nothing this disease can prevent you from doing.

Find a community that lifts you up. Get rid of the negative people, words, and elements in your life. Take baby steps. Look at yourself in the mirror and tell yourself how brave you are. Tell yourself you can do anything. And if you still doubt yourself, find me, and I will tell you.

You can do anything. I believe in you.

The Invisible Illness Chronicles: It Can Be Exhausting to Feel Like You Need To Act Healthy When You Don’t Feel Healthy

October 17th 2017

I constantly get questions about the hacks to living with chronic illness (I mean, that’s what InvisiYouth Charity’s mission in life is all about). Those questions double when it comes to life with an invisible illness. It only seemed appropriate that with part of my monthly blog I would wrote some blogs on topics surrounding invisible illness.

At InvisiYouth, we constantly promote the vitally-needed change of inclusivity on all chronic illnesses. To treat physical health and mental health exactly the same. To show equal support and aid regardless of visibility. To note that invisible illnesses are note just of the mind, but also of the body too.  So…to honor if you will, the fact that I live with one foot in both the visible and invisible physical health struggles, I’ll be occasionally posting articles on the unseen struggles. These are appropriately titled “The Invisible Illness Chronicles.”

The biggest struggles living with invisible illness (besides the actual illness itself, of course) is how you can look so healthy and feel so horrible. It can be like you’re living in a sound proof booth without the mic on, everyone can see you, but no one can hear what’s going on. For myself, it’s this weird concept of dealing with all these medical symptoms affecting my nervous system, muscles and vascular system but no one can truly see the damage it takes on my body at all times.

So when my life has to involve the outside world, specially those not in my close inner circle, I feel like I have to put up the mask, to adapt and get through my schedule for the day. I go into business meetings, and conference calls with potential advertisers and Skype calls with older youth health advocates and subconsciously, I put up a front as the “healthy nonprofit owner” because that’s what I know what I look like.  Sometimes I’m driving to meetings with slippers and sunglasses, isotoner braces on my ankle, hand and knee, but the second I park my car, I have to take all that off, strap on heels, and put on the boss lady smile to power through meetings.

Now I say “I have to” like it’s an obligation, but this is a decision I make out of societal structure if I’m honest.  I look completely healthy on some days, but anatomically, my RSD and connective tissue does not reflect that at all.  I am living with a chronic illness that I have to adapt my entire way of life around it, but the people who do not know me would not know that because I’ve had nine years to master a “new normal” way at life.

Truly, it is exhausting to act like I am healthy, to walk, sit, talk, and be the healthy person my physical body makes everyone think I am.  But also, it is equally exhausting to have to explain to every single new person that I meet what my medical situation truly is, to tell them about my chronic illness.  So I have make a decision: should I be exhausted by having to try to explain my health to people who I’m just meeting, or be exhausted by acting as healthy as I look?

I choose the later.

When you are living with an invisible illness, it can be really hard to be given any true empathy because no one can gage your medical situation by looking at you.  No one that is not a family member, sibling, caregiver, boyfriend/girlfriend, or friend knows about the health struggles you live with on a minute by minute basis, so they honesty think everything is completely fine with you.  It becomes and ‘all on you’ situation because the world will not automatically feel for your chronic illness because it cannot see it.

You need to dig deep in yourself, find strength and sympathy in yourself for your own journey with your illness.  Find comfort in those around the world that are also living with your invisible illness that can relate to your truth.

It’s a two-fold community you need:  get your supporters who can build you up like family and friends that are by your side because they love you, and get others in your life living the same journey of invisible illness that relate to you.

That is why I make the conscious decision to put on the mask when I need to be the healthy nonprofit owner that my physical body says I am on some days, to walk into meetings with sponsors or fellow charity owners and I will meet with them for hours of work, getting back into the office completely exhausted and dealing with symptoms and side effects for hours of recovery.

I repeat, it is so beyond exhausting to act as healthy as I look from both a medical standpoint and mental standpoint because my entire body physically will hurt from the trauma I put onto it to “act healthy” while I also put myself under stress from people just not relating to the situations I am going through.

But there is a bright side to all of this.  When I get back to my office, I’m on a mental rush of all the good things that will come from the work that I’m doing, from the philanthropic work I do each day for the young people I get to help.

Also, I sometimes feel like I have to act as healthy as I look when I give speeches to teens, or meet up with old friends.  And the funniest thing is that for those hours, none of them will ever know about my health…that is until I reveal that I am living with an invisible illness!  It is absolutely amazing when I pull up my photos of the physical symptoms of living with a neurovascular condition and the physical symptoms that sometimes to plague my body that sway the pendulum over to the visible illness category.

It is amazing to see the way people treat me completely changes once they can actually see my illness. And that’s so wrong if I’m honest! There is just an entire new level of recognition on these high schoolers’ faces when these young people can finally see that I am someone that lives with a chronic illness but also lives a completely fulfilled life…I just live it on my own terms the way my body allows, regardless of what society says is “normal.”

There are so many days I wish I could yell out to the world, take some sort of magic wand and immediately change how society looks at those it deems ‘different’ in one swoop.  That invisible illnesses are not something to fear or be confused by, but something to learn from and give empathy to like everything else in life.  No one should feel obligated to hide their health, it should just be an automatically understood element to someone’s lifestyle.

Everyone is unique, and if we celebrated uniqueness, then we shouldn’t have a problem embracing that when we meet people, because we would constantly be learning.

I always say that living with an invisible illness is like a game of “Where’s Waldo?” The problem is that none of these people were told to were the signature red-and-white striped shirts and black glasses so no one can find them among the crowds throughout the world.  It is our job as a society to become vocal and talk so we’re found, and to change the stigmas surrounding invisible illnesses of all kinds.

~Dominique

All of Those Exhilarating Peaks and Mega Excitements of My England Travels for InvisiYouth Charity

August 31st 2017

I recently took a trip to England all in the name of expanding InvisiYouth’s new programs and meeting with some of the amazing InvisiYouth supporters we’ve come to love and support over the years and charities we’ve admired for a while.  We have heard from some many of you that you wanted to hear all about my trip, and how I was able to handle all of that travel.  Now…I cannot give too many specifics about our new programs because we’re in development (and really, what would the surprise be if we told you everything before our prelaunch)!  But I can certainly share all the behind the scenes of my England trip and travel.

There are two big reasons why I wanted to make sure InvisiYouth made its way across the pond to England as our first major international InvisiYouth trip. One was the fact that England has been the first and most overwhelmingly supportive community since the day we launched.  The first teens and older youth with chronic illness and disability to follow InvisiYouth were all British.  And the first charities to reach across and want to lend support to InvisiYouth’s mission were from the United Kingdom.

That support network has continued to grow during our two years. We’ve even had an InvisiEvent in London last autumn, proving that InvisiYouth reaching beyond geographic, we are designed for older youth and can reach them anywhere!

The second reason to go to England was due to our Charity Friend role in the first Superhero Series Triathlon.  This was England’s very first adaptive disability triathlon, where people of all ages, disabilities and illnesses could compete in swimming, running and cycling with as much support and adaptive equipment as needed.

With the backdrop of the 2012 Olympics venue of Dorney Lake, the event was going to be unlike anything experienced before.  And with InvisiYouth having a group of teams all competing on behalf of InvisiYouth to fundraise for us, we had to make sure that we were there supporting them on their amazing job well done.

I have to say, what made the experience of bringing InvisiYouth even further into the UK even more special was that I was able to bring my entire family over with me, and getting some awesome memories of family time included in the work trip.  When life gets so chaotic and crazy, which can easily happen owning a charity and almost 25 years old, it is special to make memories with your family.

These are the people that have been my support system throughout my entire life, and even more than most families because they have become my rock throughout my health struggles.  Going through a chronic illness, growing up and finding myself as an adult with health struggles, is more complicated and challenging than any amount of words can describe.  But it has been my family that has help pull me through all the complexly stressful hardships that having RSD and EDS can really bring into your life.  I am thankful for them beyond belief, for their love and devotion, and their support of InvisiYouth Charity and our mission!

The England experience was an amazing opportunity to meet with individuals and charities who are going to be part of this new, evolving chapter of InvisiYouth Charity as it expands its advocacy education with our new tools and programs.  These illness lifestyle management tools are going to be the backbone of InvisiYouth where our events and speaking engagements will feed off as we continue to grow in the years to come.

I have always said that InvisiYouth’s focus is the age demographic in the illness/disability community, not the specific illness or disability, and we focus on the nonmedical side of the medical experience.  There are so many facets of life outside of illness when you live with one, so InvisiYouth cannot be more excited to provide support to help these young people live life and navigate life with illness so it can be fun, empowered and fulfilled in all its unique, adapted ways.

It is important for InvisiYouth to have more than just supporters in the UK, we need to have partners and lead volunteers in these other regions in order to engrain and expand the InvisiYouth tools and mission.  So it is completely obvious that these British older youth and charities will become part of our expansion and part of the InvisiYouth family. I am literally ripping at the seams wanting to share with you how fantastic each of these meetings were, how amazing these people are, and how completely overwhelmed with joy the InvisiYouth team is to know these organizations are going to be part of something we’re creating.

It is a massive THANK YOU to the always dedicated nonprofits like Once Upon a Smile, English Federation of Disability Sports, The Mix UK and CP Teens UK.

It is a gigantic THANK YOU to the empowering and fearless leaders like Sarah Alexander, Chloe Tears, Catrin Pugh and Emma Franklin.

There were even so many other British older youth and charities that we didn’t get to meet in person but we are going to be connecting with through the powers of technology and Skype now that we are back in the states.

Now, coming off such a successful meaningful and fun trip, we gotta break down the peaks and pitfalls of travel with a chronic illness like RSD.  I always joke that the pain and symptom peaks feel worth it when the experience is so worthwhile, and going over to England and creating these connections to expand InvisiYouth’s work even deeper into this nation was worthwhile.

Sitting on planes for almost nine hours straight doesn’t work well with RSD, so you must accommodate to your medical needs.  Getting medical documentation from doctors about being about to move around plane, to have people required to sit near you to help if side effects arise, all important to have.  And if you’re like me, and you are partially bionic like I am with rods and screws in my spine, then it’s always a good idea to have a medical letter notifying your metal (titanium or not) because it’s best to be safe when you’re going through airport security.

Make sure you have your own checklist for your medical needs (like medications, adaptive equipment, and what I call ‘checkup tools’).  I always like to make sure that my staple backups of support like Tylenol, KT Tape, bandage wraps, mini heat packs, resistance bands, and much more.  And you gotta make sure your wardrobe can match too.  Bringing additional layers when I deal with my limbs going too cold, shoes that can adapt to swelling easily, and dresses with slits so I could easily bring respite to my knee.  All these fashion tips made my travel easier.

But a major savior for me was timing.  I had to make sure my schedule was planned with work, with touristy stuff, as well as my medical rest time.  I had to make sure that when I was travelling, whether on a train, a cab, an Uber ride, or even a plane, that I was using my off-time wisely to recuperate from my symptoms to make it through each day.  And when I had resting time at the end of the day, it was all about heating, massages and elevation.  When you put time into your travels to focus on your health, it actually becomes a true travelling vacation and fun experience.

Yeah, when I got back to the states I had to put in some additional PT sessions, resting time and acupuncture, but with some focus on how to combat travel with a chronic illness, you can get through anything and ease what can be a setback on the return home.

Truth be told, I think England is now going to be a staple trip for Team InvisiYouth each and every year!  And while we’ll be having a team of supporters in the country year-round hosting and supporting all things InvisiYouth, I’ll be making sure that the UK is a top priority visit for us as we grow.  Not only did I love the people, culture, architecture, and cities, but I loved how warmly InvisiYouth’s mission and belief system was received and that deserves lots and lots of more England trips to come!

So…where will I be heading next for some InvisiYouth fun and work?  You’ll have to check out the InvisiYouth website for next month because we’re crossing country borders yet again!

~Dominique

Spotlight Story Program: Katy’s Story

Meet Katy Baker

Since before she can remember, Katy has been part of the healthcare system dealing with a congenital heart defect called Scimitar Syndrome. But what has defined her medical life has not defined Katy’s personal life.  She’s a university student, on a competitive trampoline team, and rare disease activist that’s using her voice to make a positive difference.

At 3 months old, I was diagnosed with Scimitar Syndrome, a congenital heart defect which also means I only have one functioning lung.

Since then, I have had lots of tests, consultations and been under the care of different hospitals all which I continue to go all through this today.

As I became a young adult in the hospital system, I have now moved to a different hospital, had a new consultant and had more emergency hospital visits which meant needing more tests and observations.

I first moved to a different hospital when I transitioned from pediatric to adult hospital services. I had to get used to knowing my way round a new hospital, the new tests I had to do and get to know my new doctors. And my health still correlated with my life as a young person. 

When I moved to University, this meant signing up to a new general physician surgery where they did not know what my condition was, and even experience going to the emergency room in a hospital I did not know.

From my perspective, being a child or teen in pediatric medical care means that you normally have the same hospital consultant over the period of about 16 or 17 years, or whenever you transition to adult services.

In pediatrics, you are used to the same environment and over time you feel settled, not because you’re in a hospital but because it’s somewhere you’ve got to know and somewhere you know you’re going to be cared for. Being a teen in pediatric medical care is unique because you still have the support from your family and there is no pressure when it comes to whether they are there for your appointments or not. Teenagers who are chronically ill often have to grow up more quickly to understand everything that is going on but they are still children and still need support from others.

Being a teen patient to me is different than being a child patient or an adult patient because as a teenager, you are exposed to a lot more in your life but at the same time, you are going through some other transitions which teenagers can often find difficult.

However, when you’re a child, you are often more dependent on your family and they might not be aware what is going on which in a way is an advantage because as a teenager, you often have more awareness of what you are going through and your illness which can be really difficult not only for your physical but also mental health.

Having to be in hospital as a teenager can be really difficult because of everything else you are going through at the same time in your life outside of your health. But I think that one of the most important things to do is ask for support when you need. Whether the support is a family member, a friend or someone else, having support while in hospital or with a chronic illness can often be useful.

I think teenagers in hospital would benefit from introductions and more information earlier about the transition process into adult health services. Young people often move to adult services when they are from between 14-18 years old and so new environments can seem quite overwhelming. Therefore, introductions and information about the adult services should be in place.

Dealing with my health has been really challenging, however there have also been some benefits because it has shaped me in to who I am today. I created a film last year with a charity about how my condition does not stop me from being part of my University’s trampolining team. Since then, I was in two newspapers, on a local radio station and now being given lots of opportunities to spread my story. I was even invited to speak at a Rare Disease Day event this year, which was such a great experience.

I am also really excited to participate in the Superhero Series disability adaptive sport event this August in England as part of InvisiYouth’s Charity Friends team to show that people with disabilities or illnesses can still achieve like everyone else.

Dealing with my health has taught me to not take life for granted and to take every opportunity that comes my way. 

In the future, I want to complete my Childhood and Youth degree, do a master’s degree and have a career working with children and young people in a hospital.

For me, it’s as if my life will be going full circle from my personal experiences and professional future.

Spotlight Story Program: Emily’s Story

Meet Emily Levy

After years of mysterious illness symptoms and suffering, Emily Levy was finally given a diagnosis of neurological Lyme disease, but that did not stop Emily for achieving her dreams.  Now as a successful boss lady and creator of the company Mighty-Well, Emily has decided to take her experience and give back to others in the invisible illness community.

My name is Emily Levy and I am the CEO and Co-Founder of Mighty Well. We create stylish and functional medical accessories.

I am a graduate from Babson College and I have severe chronic neurological Lyme disease. I first got sick in 7th grade, but because I never had a “bulls eye” rash, doctors misdiagnosed me with acute mono.

Over the next seven years, ten different doctors misdiagnosed me.

Continue reading Spotlight Story Program: Emily’s Story