Spotlight Story Program: Meet Caitlyn Fulton

Meet Caitlyn Fulton

Growing up in Scotland with cerebral palsy, Caitlyn Fulton has challenged herself to not only become her biggest cheerleader for her daily life, but to take her hobbies and bring them into the forefront of the work and activism she does. Having studied music in university and being a model, Caitlyn is constantly free in using media and art to break stigmas while also empowering other young people that they can find their inner strength in the things they love to do. While Caitlyn’s CP doesn’t define her, it gives her a lens to tackle life and achieve her goals, and we’re proud that she’s a GBL-All Star in Caitlyn’s second year working with InvisiYouth in our leadership program! Caitlyn gives so much good advice your young adults to finds ways to enjoy life even in those medical settings, and how to have your chronic illness/disability be not your sole identifier but one of the traits that make you unique!

Hi! My name is Caitlyn, I’m 20 from Scotland. I was born premature and as a result was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy. CP is a neurological condition which is caused by damage to the brain. For me, CP effects my balance and coordination.

I’ve used my health journey in my work by exploring the things I love, like my passion for music. I studied it at Diploma level [in university], and alongside music as a whole, I’m a vocalist at heart and love to sing. I can just be me and not think of my condition; it’s a freeing feeling of enjoyment too.

Secondly, I’ve used my health journey to inspire others by becoming a model—signed with Zebedee Talent—breaking down the barriers and stigmas about disability that the fashion and media industry hold.

It allows me to challenge stigmas on disability and raising awareness of disabled people in wheelchairs specifically by being seen in a positive light and that’s what I’m aiming for! There’s still a long way to go for the industry to be completely inclusive but in the last couple of years there’s been a real positive change within – step/wheel in the right direction.

I also play Boccia (a Paralympic sport) with a recognised team in Glasgow as part of Scottish Disability Sport. By doing so, not only am I raising awareness of disability but also women in sport too as it’s a rather male-dominated field.

Writing/blogging is recent addition but I like writing about topics that are important to me, such as disability rights and my hobbies which hopefully resonates with other young people as it’s great for them to know others out there like myself feel the same way as them. Through my health journey, I’ve grown in knowing I shouldn’t feel bad for having Cerebral Palsy. It makes me who I am, though it doesn’t define me. I wouldn’t be the person I am today if I was non-disabled and I don’t know if I would want to be a totally different person – I’m happy being in the skin I’m in because I’m unique.

I’ve found ways to support others by sharing similar experiences and being a source of encouragement that while yes, life throws a lot of challenges, I always tackle them head on and think there’s always a reason why. I’m a true believer in the phrase, “things happen for a reason’.”

It’s been great having support groups too, connecting with others who have the same conditions and interests as myself. Social media is certainly a great tool to connect and interact. Especially with the likes of InvisiYouth, it’s been brilliant being part of such a great organisation and connecting with other young people worldwide.

When I look at my experiences in medical settings, there’s things I’ve learned that I’d love to share with others to improve their experiences. Even if it’s your first appointment in a new hospital where you’ve been referred for treatment, changing consultants or moving up from child to adult services -I know how daunting all of this can be as I’ve experienced it first hand – become familiar with your surroundings, get to know the nurses/staff who’ll be caring for you if its procedure-related.

Also bring home comforts, items that make you feel calm.

Whenever I went in for operations knowing it would be a good few weeks before going home, it helped knowing who the team members were that would have me in their care and over time there’s a bond that’s created. It’s bittersweet going home, I always felt sad saying goodbye when it was time to go yet it was a great feeling to know I was on the right track and made great progress.

In your daily life, know that your condition doesn’t defy you. Yes, it’s part of you but your worth so much more with the interests you have, outlays that shaped you, make you who you are. Dealing with my health has shaped me in knowing that I’ll experience many hurdles in life but I’ll always get through them no matter what. As I’ve gotten older I don’t feel embarrassed about having a disability and now I embrace it—it’s my superpower and I have a story to tell.

My main message: There will be good and bad days but know that your condition makes you who you are. Strive to be the best version of yourself, make the most of it.

I always say to myself ‘I was given this life because I was strong enough to live it’: strong enough to the face the battles that come my way and cherish the moments in live that are to be remembered. Look your bad days in the eye and know you’ll overcome them, maybe not tomorrow or the next day but you will achieve. Whenever you feel good in yourself, you can get through it all and survived another day, that’s what I tell myself and you should too – be proud!

Spotlight Story Program: Meet Rachel Hoy

Meet Rachel Hoy

Starting off 2021 with an upgrade to our Spotlight Story Program because it will now be MONTHLY human stories told BY young people FOR young people in the chronic illness/disability/mental health community! 

There is no better person to start the Spotlight Story Program for the new year than lyme disease activist and owner of the popular brand Tee Spoonies, Rachel Hoy. Being part of our Global Brand Leaders Program for two years, now as a #GBLAllStar, Australian Rachel has been such a firm believer for empowering young people with chronic illnesses to advocate for themselves. This coming from her experience living with Lyme disease and co-infections, along with POTS, MCAS, interstitial cystitis and autoimmune conditions. She understands that balancing life, work and chronic illness takes time–especially living with Lyme disease in Australia as comprehension and treatment access is harder to come by–and learning how you empower yourself to enjoy and succeed in life with any health struggles was something Rachel was super passionate for, and it resulted in her creating her own brand Tee Spoonies. Selling ethically made products like pocket tees, scrunchies, cards and more, Rachel has built a community behind Tee Spoonies that mirrors her style of activism perfectly!

My name is Rach – I’m a 28 year old Australian living with Lyme disease & co infections as well as POTS, MCAS, interstitial cystitis and autoimmune conditions.

I was infected with Lyme & co infections on a trip to the USA after finishing my Master’s degree six years ago.

The first two years after getting sick I spent most of my time searching for a diagnosis, only to find out when it did come, that the hardest part was ahead of me.

At 22 years, I had travelled the world, completed two degrees and worked as youth state manager and campaign designer for World Vision Australia, so having to step back to focus on my health was a steep learning curve.

Living with chronic Lyme disease in Australia is especially hard – it is recognised and understood even less here than overseas, which means limited access to doctors and treatments.

After six years of living with Lyme & co my illness has really progressed.

My main symptoms are severe joint pain, fatigue leaving me mainly housebound, headaches/migraines, gut, bladder and mast cell problems, and neurological issues including up to twenty seizures per day.

I learnt rather quickly how tough it could be living with chronic illness as a young person, including doctors who denied the severity of my illness and friends who left my side in the hard times.

I also realised the apparent need for us to be continually advocating for ourselves as chronically ill youth.

One day I had a light bulb moment and realised I could combine a number of my passions together: advocacy, ethical consumerism and design, in order to raise awareness about living with invisible illness.

My first design idea with Tee Spoonies was the invisible illness pocket tee, which has grown to be the most popular!

Having the tee resonate with so many invisible illness warriors has meant a lot.

I sew all of the pockets myself which adds a personal touch.

The chronic illness community is important to so many, and being a part of it in this way, and being able to create products that empower fellow spoonies has been a blessing.

Working with InvisiYouth the past two years has been a great experience. I’m proud to donate 100% of profits from our fundraiser upcycled scrunchie packs & 50% of profits from our recycled paper gift card packs to InvisiYouth.

Our brand is all about making unique, sustainable, ethically made products that are a labour of love.

We also donate 10% of all profits to the Lyme Disease Association of Australia. You can check out more on our website here: teespoonies.com

If I could give some pieces of advice to young people struggling with the throws of chronic & invisible illnesses it would be to remember your inherent value in this world over anything you could possibly accomplish.

Goals are great but values are key.

Often living with chronic illness can mean pushing back or rearranging timelines or goals, which can be disheartening, but who you are in life is a lot more important than where you are in life.

And if you’re reading this now I already know who you are is amazing, because the perseverance, resilience and strength living with serious illness requires does not come easily.

Secondly, you are not alone.

No matter how lonely, devastated or isolated you feel – there is a community out there who understand what you’re going through, and want to support, empower and help you in any way they can.

And lastly, YOU know YOU better than anyone!

Trust in yourself and advocate for your needs… with a little help from your friends 🙂

*to learn more about Rachel’s involvement in our GBL Program, click here. And to learn more about Rachel’s products with Tee Spoonies, click here.*

 

Spotlight Story Program: Meet Bridget Gum

Meet Bridget Gum

Our latest Spotlight Story comes from the East Coast of the United States, and this is not just any addition into our Spotlight Story Program, but from a special young woman who has worked her way up through InvisiYouth’s programming. 18-year-old Bridget Gum because as a volunteer with InvisiYouth during her senior year of high school, and transitioned into our international leadership program, Global Brand Leaders as a GBL-Ambassador. Bridget has fused her experience living with a rare autoimmune disorder called Transverse Myelitis and her love of advocacy, into a great future for her work as she’s now a student at Rider University with aims of helping others. 

My name is Bridget Gum and on November 11, 2002 I was found in my crib completely limp. Since I was a seven month old baby, it made it very challenging to diagnose me because I couldn’t communicate loss of sensation or ability to move, or even if I lost control of my bowel and bladder capabilities.

After six months of living in and out of hospitals and nearly dying a couple of times, I was finally diagnosed with a rare auto-immune disorder called Transverse Myelitis. This disorder attacked my immune system as well as my spinal cord, at the C5-C8 level of my spine, right around what the doctors call “Hangman’s Noose”, which is called that because most people lose the ability to breath and die.

Thankfully, for reasons no one can explain, my spinal cord injury is incomplete, which means my sensory and motor level doesn’t just stop at one level.

As a very young child, I was in therapy for an extremely long time so as to hopefully regain as much function as possible, however, I was only able to have movement and sensation from my shoulders up. Finally, when it was time, I was allowed to go to preschool. I was so excited. A couple of years ago, I found a comic that summarized my experience perfectly: a girl who uses a wheelchair at a specially designed desk for a wheelchair completely oblivious to the fact she was different.

My family treated me normally so when I went to school, I was made aware of how different I was. I grew up in an almost entirely able-bodied community, until I was in fourth grade. I finally went to a family summer camp made entirely for others with my disability, which was life-changing.

It was the first time I was with others like me, and not just being sick in a hospital together, actually doing fun activities. This was when I decided to educate myself on disabled culture and to become an advocate, for both myself and others. I began to work with my therapists to become more independent and began to work with my school to get better services and more appropriate accommodations. In eighth grade, I was diagnosed with epilepsy, completely unrelated to my previous disability.

The memory reset and medications from the seizures completely changed me and how I saw the world. I then became more open and helpful to others because I saw how helpful other people were to me and I really wanted to return that favor to the world.

Throughout my many years of hospitalizations and living with this disability, I learned a lot of responsibility and maturity, which is almost a requirement for living with a disability if you want independence. 

These qualities often seep into my personal life to the point where my friends call me the “Mom” of the group because I’m always helping people, listen to their problems, and I’m prepared for every situation, often in case of emergency.

While the lives of people with disabilities are very different, I wish we could live in a world where it doesn’t have to be.

Of course there will always be an element of medical needs that is different than an able-bodied person, I hope that others with disabilities won’t have to fight for accommodations or be surprised and overly grateful when someone makes you feel like an equal, and not someone who needs to be helped or as a burden.

Now, I have graduated high school and will be attending Rider University as a member of their honors program. And I have joined InvisiYouth Charity’s leadership program, Global Brand Leaders. I’m so excited about being a GBL-Ambassador for InvisiYouth because I want to help people and make the world a better place for everyone who lives in it, especially those with disabilities, and this gives me a platform to do that.

 

InvisiYouth Launches Fundraiser Campaign, InvisiYouth Give Back Challenge for December

November 25, 2019

InvisiYouth’s month-long fundraiser campaign, InvisiYouth Give Back Challenge, launches December 1st and has goals beyond just raising needed funds that will support our programs/events helping young adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities.

(Donate on our JustGiving Page or GoFundMe Page!

100% goes towards InvisiYouth’s 2020 programs!)

This is a fundraiser encouraging everyone to find the ways in their life they can donate back at any scale—where quantity per donor is NOT the priority. It is all about mobilizing young people and their support networks to be small pieces of a large fundraising goal and knowing with certainty each cent matters.

#IYGiveBackChallenge is the first fundraiser campaign built to be easy and stress-free…how amazing is it to be able to feel good AND do good during the holiday season without the hassle.

And the steps to give back are simple:

1. Find one part in your daily life this December and flip it into a mini fundraiser moment!

We’ve got lots of quick #IYGiveBackChallenge ideas here!

Make your coffee and donate that to InvisiYouth!

Collect your coins for December and make that a donation 

Donate in someone’s name as part of your holiday gift that keeps on giving!

Make those holiday parties and friend movie night hangouts super feel good and collect mini-donations from each person for InvisiYouth!

Just want to be awesome one day and drop a donation, that’s perfect!

More ideas on our website too!

2. Donate that amount (any amount, in any currency) to either of our fundraiser pages! (JustGiving or GoFundMe)

3. Donate Shout yourself! Use our #IYGiveBackChallenge certificate on our Instagram or download it here. Plus, we want to give you a shout out for your donation! So tag @invisiyouth!

4. We encourage everyone to get into the giving back spirit and challenge up to four people to also take the #IYGiveBackChallenge!

Friends, family, colleagues, loved ones, Instagram friends or your favorite celebs, influencers and athletes too! Anyone you can think of, challenge them, the more the merrier!

Our goals of $2,000 is so tangible if each person even donates the smallest amount they can and creates a way of donations for change!

100% of all donations in the #IYGiveBackChallenge will be used for InvisiYouth’s 2020 programs (virtual, resources, and leadership training opportunities) and events. Your money will be directly aiding young adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities that truly need our help to thrive and succeed in their lives.

When you donate to InvisiYouth Charity, you are changing a life for the better, and that’s a guarantee! So please, help us be able to continue our work supporting these deserving young people because we cannot do it without you.

Take the InvisiYouth Give Back Challenge, share it on social media, challenge your friends, family, followers and favorite celebrities to get philanthropic with you! What better way to end 2019 feeling good about yourself than knowing each cent you donate is impacting thousands of lives in the year ahead of us!

InvisiYouth Partners Up with Mighty Well for Another New York City Meetup

September 1, 2019 

Last month, InvisiYouth partnered up with our friends at Mighty Well for another meetup. This time it was in Midtown New York City at the Le Pain Quotidien Bryant ParkMighty Well is n athleisure company that makes medical accessory products designed to put strength, confidence and mobility back into the toolkit of spoonies and anyone else coping with ah health setback, so style and function are blended together.  This is our second year cohosting a meetup with Mighty Well, so perhaps this can be an annual alliance—what do you think?

InvisiEvents are unique for exactly all the reasons you can see above: they are fun, free, nontraditional, quirky, empowering, and philanthropic. Why not make hanging out with your friends and family an opportunity to also fundraise for charity?

Why not use your love of hanging out with friends and add a fundraiser element to it—so you pay it forward without having any hassle of developing an event from the ground up?

Why not host a hangout and meet an entire new community of awesome young adults while also fundraising?

Why not partner up with fellow nonprofits and businesses to bring empowerment and kickass joy to lots of young adults to multiple our outreach?

The answer to these questions is simple: InvisiEvents is going to international and we’re making our hangouts and our style of events regular throughout the year! But to do this…we need your help!

Many of you told us which cities you want InvisiYouth to come to next, and we need all your support to bring this to life! We need YOU to help be our cohosts, help us come to your cities and make the events a reality! Whether a brunch, yoga class, cooking day, movie night, sporting activity, painting class, coffee house meetup, wine tasting, or something totally different, we want to know what venues, what locations we can go to next.

If you want to help us bring these events to life, it’s simple—contact us on our website, or DM us on social media by FacebookTwitter or Instagram! We always answer and we want you to join the InvisiYouth family!

WEGO Health Awards 2019 Nominates both InvisiYouth Chat Sessions video podcast and founder Dominique Viel

July 29, 2019

InvisiYouth Charity has felt the love this summer as it was announced InvisiYouth Charity got two nominations with the 2019 WEGO Health Awards. Our video podcast series, InvisiYouth Chat Sessions, was nominated for Best in Show: Podcast, and our Founder/Executive Director, Dominique Viel, was nominated for Patient Leader Hero. WEGO Health is a company that connects millions of engaged healthcare consumers by allowing networks of leading patient advocates to work and collaborate across health conditions, disciplines, and topics.

Every year since 2011, WEGO Health has hosted their awards, a celebration of the world’s leading healthcare advocates, especially in the virtual space! And you know how much we love a good virtual activism platform—just take a look at our video podcast series, downloadable resources and advocacy campaigns! Categories range from Best Video Series and Best Team Performance, to Best Instagram, Healthcare Collaboration Patient, Advocating for One Another and Best Kept Secret.

There are over 6,000 nominees across 15 categories which go through a month of endorsements from the general public and then a judging panel help narrow it down to the short-list nominees per category. And it is from this that the ultimate winners are selected and get to go to Las Vegas, Nevada in October for the actual ceremony.

And what makes these award nominations for Dominique and InvisiYouth Chat Sessions so amazing is that a couple of our Global Brand Leaders are also nominees! Last year, Global Brand Leader-All Star Effie Koliopoulos from Chicago, IL was the winner for Rookie of the Year 2018! This year, our Global Brand Leader Mikaela Basile from Canada is nominated for Best Instagram, while our Global Brand Leader-All Star Madi Vanstone, also from Canada, is nominated for Patient Leader Hero, Best in Show: Podcast, and Advocating for Another.

To see such a strong pull of InvisiYouth Charity team members in the WEGO Health Awards is incredible because it shows how much our activism style affects the larger chronic illness and disability community to nominate all of them.

Lastly, we want to thank YOU for all the endorsements for us! To win these awards would be a dream, and it will definitely give more exposure to InvisiYouth’s programming and in return, give us opportunities for charitable sponsorships and partnerships to reach even more older youth with chronic illnesses and disabilities around the world. So what’s next? Will Dominique, our video podcast series, and our Global Brand Leaders win these WEGO Health Awards? Time will tell and we will keep you in the loop, but nonetheless, nominations are so humbling and we are honored.

InvisiYouth Introduces New Celebrity Ambassador, Actress and Disability Activist Melissa Johns

December 27, 2017

InvisiYouth Charity is excited to announce its newest Celebrity Ambassador, British actress and disability activist Melissa Johns.  Best known for her role of Sade in BBC’s The Interceptor and most recent role of Imogen Pascoe on ITV’s Coronation Street, Melissa has been able to show her talents across England, and her star keeps on rising.

From Herefordshire, England, Melissa is a change-maker, and the entire team at InvisiYouth Charity feels so honored to have her support and enthusiasm to join our community and give back to the older youth population living with health struggles and disabilities.

Melissa was born without her right hand and forearm, and while having a limb difference has brought many challenges, but it has also made Melissa a strong advocate through her acting. Breaking barriers and owning one’s uniqueness is part of Melissa’s mission.

She attended East 15 Acting School in London as one of a few actors with a disability accepted, won the prestigious Laurence Olivier Award as one of the first physically disabled actors, and has appeared on numerous theatre shows across the UK and TV series.

What makes Melissa stand out to the InvisiYouth team is her passion to use her platform from her acting career to give back others living with a disability. With a fellow Coronation Street actor, Cherylee Houston, Melissa co-founded TripleC, a disability-led organization in England that uses drama and theatre workshops to enhance the lives of people living with disabilities.

Melissa is so passionate about giving back, motivating others and bringing change, so her enthusiasm to join the InvisiYouth family means the world.

“Becoming an ambassador for InvisiYouth is an incredible honour,” Johns said. “To work with a charity that advocate for teens & young adults with chronic illnesses/disabilities as well as provide programmes/events that support independence and empowerment means the world to me. I’ll certainly do all I can to help these incredible individuals be anything but invisible.”

From her role of Imogen on Coronation Street and her disability activism work, Melissa was recognized by the JCI UK Ten Outstanding Young Persons Award for breaking the mold and getting people with disabilities positively shown on stage and screen.

And she’ll even be working with modelling organizations to motivate change on positive body image for those with physical disabilities.

Having Melissa Johns as a Celebrity Ambassador is something InvisiYouth Charity is so proud of because Melissa extends her mission to inspire other with limb differences.

“Use what makes you different,” Johns said.  “Magnify it. Glorify it and use it to make the changes that you want to see.”

She is such a strong, proud advocate for this community, and we’re thrilled that Melissa will now be able to motivate older youth with all types of disabilities and chronic illnesses, as our new InvisiYouth Celebrity Ambassador.

Her ability to inspire and shatter the stereotypes surrounding disability is amazing and we cannot wait to work more with Melissa in InvisiYouth’s work and help young adults navigate their life and feel empowered with health struggles or disabilities.