Spotlight Story Program: Meet Rachel Hoy

Meet Rachel Hoy

Starting off 2021 with an upgrade to our Spotlight Story Program because it will now be MONTHLY human stories told BY young people FOR young people in the chronic illness/disability/mental health community! 

There is no better person to start the Spotlight Story Program for the new year than lyme disease activist and owner of the popular brand Tee Spoonies, Rachel Hoy. Being part of our Global Brand Leaders Program for two years, now as a #GBLAllStar, Australian Rachel has been such a firm believer for empowering young people with chronic illnesses to advocate for themselves. This coming from her experience living with Lyme disease and co-infections, along with POTS, MCAS, interstitial cystitis and autoimmune conditions. She understands that balancing life, work and chronic illness takes time–especially living with Lyme disease in Australia as comprehension and treatment access is harder to come by–and learning how you empower yourself to enjoy and succeed in life with any health struggles was something Rachel was super passionate for, and it resulted in her creating her own brand Tee Spoonies. Selling ethically made products like pocket tees, scrunchies, cards and more, Rachel has built a community behind Tee Spoonies that mirrors her style of activism perfectly!

My name is Rach – I’m a 28 year old Australian living with Lyme disease & co infections as well as POTS, MCAS, interstitial cystitis and autoimmune conditions.

I was infected with Lyme & co infections on a trip to the USA after finishing my Master’s degree six years ago.

The first two years after getting sick I spent most of my time searching for a diagnosis, only to find out when it did come, that the hardest part was ahead of me.

At 22 years, I had travelled the world, completed two degrees and worked as youth state manager and campaign designer for World Vision Australia, so having to step back to focus on my health was a steep learning curve.

Living with chronic Lyme disease in Australia is especially hard – it is recognised and understood even less here than overseas, which means limited access to doctors and treatments.

After six years of living with Lyme & co my illness has really progressed.

My main symptoms are severe joint pain, fatigue leaving me mainly housebound, headaches/migraines, gut, bladder and mast cell problems, and neurological issues including up to twenty seizures per day.

I learnt rather quickly how tough it could be living with chronic illness as a young person, including doctors who denied the severity of my illness and friends who left my side in the hard times.

I also realised the apparent need for us to be continually advocating for ourselves as chronically ill youth.

One day I had a light bulb moment and realised I could combine a number of my passions together: advocacy, ethical consumerism and design, in order to raise awareness about living with invisible illness.

My first design idea with Tee Spoonies was the invisible illness pocket tee, which has grown to be the most popular!

Having the tee resonate with so many invisible illness warriors has meant a lot.

I sew all of the pockets myself which adds a personal touch.

The chronic illness community is important to so many, and being a part of it in this way, and being able to create products that empower fellow spoonies has been a blessing.

Working with InvisiYouth the past two years has been a great experience. I’m proud to donate 100% of profits from our fundraiser upcycled scrunchie packs & 50% of profits from our recycled paper gift card packs to InvisiYouth.

Our brand is all about making unique, sustainable, ethically made products that are a labour of love.

We also donate 10% of all profits to the Lyme Disease Association of Australia. You can check out more on our website here: teespoonies.com

If I could give some pieces of advice to young people struggling with the throws of chronic & invisible illnesses it would be to remember your inherent value in this world over anything you could possibly accomplish.

Goals are great but values are key.

Often living with chronic illness can mean pushing back or rearranging timelines or goals, which can be disheartening, but who you are in life is a lot more important than where you are in life.

And if you’re reading this now I already know who you are is amazing, because the perseverance, resilience and strength living with serious illness requires does not come easily.

Secondly, you are not alone.

No matter how lonely, devastated or isolated you feel – there is a community out there who understand what you’re going through, and want to support, empower and help you in any way they can.

And lastly, YOU know YOU better than anyone!

Trust in yourself and advocate for your needs… with a little help from your friends 🙂

*to learn more about Rachel’s involvement in our GBL Program, click here. And to learn more about Rachel’s products with Tee Spoonies, click here.*

 

Spotlight Story Program: Scarlett Aylen’s Story

Meet Scarlett Aylen

Our latest Spotlight Story comes from across the Atlantic Ocean with a fresh take on empowerment and facing the obstacles that life can throw at us. We were so excited to hear from 20-year-old university student from the United Kingdom, Scarlett Aylen, when she submitted her story. Scarlett is an example that chronic illness and health struggles affect the entire person, both physically and mentally, and she advocates each young person should be supported as an entire being.  Her inner strength feeds into her organization RCASS, helping young people and their families after a scoliosis diagnosis. You learn so much through Scarlett’s story about resilience, advocacy, and finding ways to enjoy life.

It all started when I walked into a consulting room and saw my spine, looking horrifically and severely curved on a huge screen right in front of me. I was 12 and was diagnosed with severe scoliosis. I cried and cried to the point where the consultant and nurse had to let me leave the appointment without having one. I didn’t feel like a young girl, but now I see 12-year old’s and realized why my parents were so scared for me. I spent 9 months in and out of the worst time of my life, I was depressed and didn’t speak to my family. I changed.

I hid in a thick jumper and coat at school so nobody could see my deformed back, despite it being 30°C and summer. In the months leading up to the operation, my mental health continued to deteriorate, but the waiting list was preventing me from the operation I was desperate for. After the major surgery to fix the curve in my spine, the recovery was long. It took months. I was so scared to have water on my back. I remember so vividly having a panic attack when it was time to shower for the first time since the operation. It took me months to get into a swimming pool and I would insist on covering myself up. I couldn’t do sports anymore. I used to ride, swim and do triathlons competitively but I gave everything I spent my childhood doing, up. Every time I tried to exercise there was always an excuse. But I was on the road to recovery, so it was ok.

Unfortunately, this was just the start of the problems. I thought I would just get better. Then I started to realize I couldn’t breathe. At one point, it felt like I could barely breathe at all. I also started experiencing severe anxiety on return to school and fought with panic disorder for about a year. I went to the doctors on multiple occasions and each time they told me I was just experiencing breathlessness due to anxiety. I argued and finally got a referral to a pediatrician, who allergy tested me. She said my lungs were the age of a 70-year-old but again, it was just anxiety! Through my GCSE years, I had therapy and I thought the anxiety was gone. It was just hiding. I still could not breathe. Eventually I saw a respiratory specialist who diagnosed me with restrictive lung disease and asthma.  The scan showed that one of my lungs is half the size of the other and my heart is not in the same place as everyone else’s because of this, and that ¼ of my big lung wasn’t even working due to infection.

However, having someone take me seriously was a huge relief. I had special respiratory physiotherapy and now take medication for my lungs. Being me, I was unlucky again.

The respiratory specialist had found a screw in a CT scan of my lungs that was dangerously close to my heart and sent me back to the spinal surgeon. He told me the operation wasn’t urgent, but that he had cancelled someone’s surgery (who waited a year to have it) and that he wanted to do it tomorrow. I woke up screaming in pain. My shoulders and neck have never been the same since. The surgeon couldn’t find anything wrong in a scan afterwards, so he sent me to a pain specialist. He basically said that I had no reason to be in chronic pain so off I go. I went to a specialist and got 3 medications to help with the pain. I have 16 Botox injections every 6 months when I can afford them, and it is the only thing that relaxes my neck and shoulders. The way I would describe the pain is severe, chronic and incredibly tense. They were constantly in spasm, which was excruciating and incredibly tiring.

By the end of my further education, I had missed out on 8 months of school and college due to pain, anxiety and fatigue. I was in so much pain and anxiety during my final exams, that I landed myself in the ER the day before my last ones from a tachycardia attack where my heart sat at 190 BPM for 3 hours.  Luckily, I take medication for my heart and I am symptom free most of the time, but it again took years to diagnose since the GP dismissed palpitations and a fast heart rate as being ‘anxiety’.

Nowadays, I focus on what my body needs. Recently, I discovered that the fatigue I’d been having for years, that kept getting worse was probably a neurological condition called narcolepsy, after the GP just told me it was probably anxiety, but then tried to pass it off as ME (chronic fatigue syndrome) after one appointment. I am now getting treatment for this which is exciting!

One of the perks of dealing with conditions like mine over a long period of time (over 7 years now) is that it has allowed me to learn about myself and what works for me. I understand it now.  Before, I wouldn’t let myself rest if I was about to collapse from exhaustion, but now I give my body time to recover before I start doing things again. I have friends with ME and the tips they have given me for my conditions help me as well, even though I don’t have it.

If I have, what I call a ‘pain crisis’, where my pain is worse than the average daily pain I get anyway, I have learnt to stop absolutely everything. It is hard to do that when you have a lot of goals, but it is an important step towards managing your body. After I turned 17, I started realizing I couldn’t hide from doing the things my friends could do for the rest of my life. I plucked up some courage and started doing things like get back on a horse and going to the gym.

I took a gap year and decided that it wasn’t fair on young people who had to wait for scoliosis surgery to have no support before and after the operation, so I have decided to set up my own organization to help this and called it RCASS.

I want to help young people and their parents after a diagnosis of scoliosis. The end goal is to provide more support in the future and to register as a charity to help provide young people with opportunities to recover confidence after scoliosis surgery. It is still in the starting stage, but I can’t wait to work on it properly!

I took a gap year before I went to university and decided its purpose was to ‘challenge myself to lengths I had not done before’. I went travelling alone, I went up mountains, on hikes, skiing, jumping off cliffs, surfing, volunteering and many more activities. I am incredibly proud of myself, but I must admit, the pain was still there. My biggest achievement to date is building the confidence to wear a bikini on a beach or by a pool. I never used to wear a small amount of clothes, but gradually I have worked up and now I don’t browse the shops thinking about what can hide my back, I’d rather show it!

As for my mental health, I needed the gap year and it did me the world of good. I still have some wobbly moments sometimes, and the anxiety meant I flew home 3 times on my travelling. But overall, I feel that my experiences have made me 10 times as more empathetic, understanding and positive compared to what I would have been like if nothing had ever happened to me! Another life changing moment was when I was told ‘a problem shared is a problem solved’.

It isn’t always easy when it comes to other young people but when I got to about 16 everyone started understanding and now I am so lucky to have incredibly supportive friends after I explain my problems to them, they help me with lots of things that I wouldn’t have help with if I didn’t share my story.

I tend to joke about my past now, and although it has been a harrowing journey, I know I am the person I am today from the experience.  Time has taught me how to look after myself. Although I still have problems, I know how to deal with them both in a better mental mindset and physical one too.

InvisiYouth Partners Up with Mighty Well for Another New York City Meetup

September 1, 2019 

Last month, InvisiYouth partnered up with our friends at Mighty Well for another meetup. This time it was in Midtown New York City at the Le Pain Quotidien Bryant ParkMighty Well is n athleisure company that makes medical accessory products designed to put strength, confidence and mobility back into the toolkit of spoonies and anyone else coping with ah health setback, so style and function are blended together.  This is our second year cohosting a meetup with Mighty Well, so perhaps this can be an annual alliance—what do you think?

InvisiEvents are unique for exactly all the reasons you can see above: they are fun, free, nontraditional, quirky, empowering, and philanthropic. Why not make hanging out with your friends and family an opportunity to also fundraise for charity?

Why not use your love of hanging out with friends and add a fundraiser element to it—so you pay it forward without having any hassle of developing an event from the ground up?

Why not host a hangout and meet an entire new community of awesome young adults while also fundraising?

Why not partner up with fellow nonprofits and businesses to bring empowerment and kickass joy to lots of young adults to multiple our outreach?

The answer to these questions is simple: InvisiEvents is going to international and we’re making our hangouts and our style of events regular throughout the year! But to do this…we need your help!

Many of you told us which cities you want InvisiYouth to come to next, and we need all your support to bring this to life! We need YOU to help be our cohosts, help us come to your cities and make the events a reality! Whether a brunch, yoga class, cooking day, movie night, sporting activity, painting class, coffee house meetup, wine tasting, or something totally different, we want to know what venues, what locations we can go to next.

If you want to help us bring these events to life, it’s simple—contact us on our website, or DM us on social media by FacebookTwitter or Instagram! We always answer and we want you to join the InvisiYouth family!

InvisiEvents Returns in Full Swing to Start off 2019 in Three American Cities

January 15, 2019 

This year, the InvisiYouth Charity team decided to bring back one of its most popular (and original) programs…the InvisiEvents! These are not just the events that we support our Global Brand Leaders hosting all over the United States, Canada and now Australia. And they’re not only our FUNdraiser events either—where groups ranging in all sizes bring donations to collect at their hangouts for InvisiYouth, whether that’s a dinner party, movie night, TV premiere or hangout.  We still want more of these to happen in 2019 and beyond…but we’ll tell you about that in a bit.

It was a mission for InvisiYouth that we would provide official InvisiYouth events for FREE regularly during the year. A huge goal for us is to allow young adults with any chronic illnesses/disabilities—both physical and mental—the opportunities to build community and be more empowered in social gatherings. For InvisiYouth, these are hangouts or meetups, so the traditional formula for charity events and fundraising is out the door!

We want you and your friends (both in and out of the chronic illness community) to do things you enjoy WHILE giving back!

What we also want to do is host more of our own hangouts with you at the helm of our creativity. And a way to go one step further is to partner up with other nonprofits and businesses. We are all about community and partnership so when we can collaborate with other like-minded charities/businesses, and build an even larger network of young adults, the better we can be.

At the start of the year, we partnered up with one of our longtime nonprofit friends, Suffering the Silence. They are a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that use artistic projects such as photography campaigns (our founder has been featured in one photoshoot campaign too!!), documentaries, galleries, story nights and retreats to share the power of listening and sharing illness stories to generate the healing force of open and honest storytelling. They hope to build awareness and reform perception and treatment of the often silences—the chronic disease community.

And since they not only work across the USA, but also have badass female founders, Allie Cashel and Erica Lupinacci, it was a perfect fit! We wanted to start the year building all that self-care and community to provide fun hangouts. And our THREE gatherings went from coast to coast, so we could connect, relax and enjoy some food and coffee!

In Hoboken, New Jersey, our founder Dominique Viel and STS cofounder Allie Cashel, hosted a fun brunch—provided by the lovely Wicked Wolf Hoboken—with great food, good views of the NYC skyline and awesome hospitality.

In the Windy City of Chicago, Illinois, our Global Brad Leader-All Star and STS Ambassador, Effie Koliopoulos, held down the fort on our super cozy coffee house hangout. And with delicious pastries provided by Beatrix Chicago and a modern atmosphere of Tri-Door Chicago hosting, who wouldn’t love it!

And last, but certainly not least, the other wonderful cofounder of STS, Erica Luppinacci, led our Los Angeles, California coffee house meetup at the chill Madison Park and Coffee with lots of conversation!

If you want to help us bring these events to life, it’s simple—contact us on our website, or DM us on social media by FacebookTwitter or Instagram! We always answer and we want you to join the InvisiYouth family!

InvisiYouth Launches its First Annual Global Brand Leaders Program

March 30, 2018

This month, InvisiYouth Charity launched its first ever Global Brand Leader Program, a coalition that consisted of accomplished teens and young adults from across the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, which focuses on activism and fundraising campaigns.

These are a select group of youth that are all leaders in their communities, from healthcare advocates and disability activists, YouTubers and social media influencers, to business owners and philanthropists. What unites them is not their diagnoses, but rather their passion to pay it forward, empower, crack stigmas and make a difference, all the while being young adults. As InvisiYouth coins the term “medically adult-ish”™ we know all our Global Brand Leaders fall into that community that we support their our lifestyle and confidence empowerment and programming.

All our Brand Leaders are motivated and fun-loving individuals who contribute to their communities and in the health sector and beyond, and will work with InvisiYouth to mutually promote empowerment and raise funds for InvisiYouth’s programs that assist and embolden all young adults living with any illness or disability.

And they get access to all our merchandise, partnership gifts, and programs before anyone else! The objective: further InvisiYouth’s mission into their neighborhoods, to broaden awareness and access to supportive InvisiYouth events and programs can continue to be provided for our growing international young adult network.

What inspired this program was our desire to get involved with even more youth around the world that connect with InvisiYouth and want to expand our reach.  We do so much work virtually, host events in multiple cities and it has been our desire to connect even more with the young adults that support InvisiYouth.

What better way than to build a coalition of young adult rebel game-changers that will expand our grassroots efforts to support even more people in different countries, to bring our programs and events to more cities, and to support more youth. And we want to mutually support all the incredible work that is being done by so many young adults too, promoting their work to the world.

That is a major part of why we decided to create the Global Brand Leaders Program: we wanted to bring more awareness and support to the brilliant work and advocacy that’s being done by countless youth in so many countries, in hopes that by uniting them within InvisiYouth Charity—an organization that’s non-illness specific—we can tackle and overcome even more misconceptions about different illnesses and disabilities, both physical and mental.

Our motto: when we get this group to collaboratively work and motivate each other’s projects, to expand our own within them, InvisiYouth will be able to empower all young adults to gain their voice, confidence and tools to keep living the most fun and fulfilled lives with any health struggles.

Our Global Brand Leader Program is annual, and we’re excited to have an entire new group joining this 2018-2019 class in May…so if YOU want to become a Brand Leader, to support InvisiYouth’s mission, get involved in some philanthropy, and get your projects a major platform of international exposure, we want to hear from you.  Contact us if you, or a friend you know, would be a great Brand Leader!

Mighty Well and InvisiYouth Charity’s Chronic Illness Meet Up Takes on NYC

November 17, 2017

Last week, InvisiYouth Charity cohosted a fun hangout event in downtown New York City with longtime philanthropic friend Mighty Well, a fashionable medical accessories company, that was open to all young people with chronic illnesses and their friends and loved ones.

This meet-up was designed to bring together individuals with all types of chronic illnesses to meet new people, get some free swag, swap positive and funny illness stories, and get to know the missions of Mighty Well and InvisiYouth Charity better.

As Mighty Well promotes their company, build even more “friends in the fight” so the supporters (friends, family and caregivers) on the outside of illness can learn more supportive ways to communicate.

The meet-up was focused on the topic of relationships and chronic illness.

Both platonic and romantic, how to build and sustain relationships as older youth living with an illness or disability is one of the most asked questions for our community, especially InvisiYouth.

It was fun, interesting, and had lots of eye-opening moments and humor; that is key for both InvisiYouth and Mighty Well.

We are all about changing the narrative tone around chronic illness: that it is meant to find the brightness and humor in life’s challenges with honesty, not focus on the negatives and struggles.

The group was a big mix of ages, illnesses and relationships.  Some were couples, others singles, and some were friends coming to support.

Their illnesses even ranged from the visible and invisible; like Lyme disease, lupus, neurovascular conditions, POTS, connective tissue disorders and mental health challenges.

Being able to bring together the ‘healthy’ friends and loved ones was critical because it allowed others to learn from each other and see how different relationships can be formed when living with chronic illness.

For both InvisiYouth Charity and Mighty Well, meet ups and getting to know the older youth chronic illness and disability community is a main part of their work.

2018 will continue to grow in their philanthropic missions, with Mighty Well’s new products and InvisiYouth’s new programming and events, next year will be a great addition for both.

Keep up to date on all of what InvisiYouth Charity and Mighty Well have in store by following their social media:  InvisiYouth on social media at @invisiyouth and Mighty Well on Twitter @livemightywell and Instagram @mightywell_

And if you want to be part of InvisiYouth’s new programs and events, make sure to contact us and we’ll send you more information and even help you design your own InvisiYouth event or fun mini-fundraiser!

And the Total is in! InvisiYouth’s Charity Teams for England’s Superhero Disability Triathlon Raised a Total of…

By Dominique Viel

September 8, 2017

After months of fundraising, campaigning with family and friends and online through our GoFundMe Page, InvisiYouth’s Charity Teams that participated in England’s first inclusive disability adaptive triathlon have ended their fundraisers.

We received donations online and donations in the mail and on our website’s donate page too! We are happy to announce that our Charity Teams fundraised a grand total of $1,000!

All these funds are going directly into building InvisiYouth’s new illness management tools and programs that will give back to so many teens and young adults with chronic illnesses.

These tools and programs will be unique, showing a wide older youth illness and disability community all the life hacks and tips to navigate life while living with illness, or as we call it, the non-medical side to medial experiences. 100% these donations are going to help build them!

Each of our teams competed in three sports at the Olympic Dorney Lake in Windsor, England: swimming, running and cycling.  Different teams of people with disabilities and chronic illnesses came out from across the country, along with their supporters of friends and family (and sometimes dogs too), all who worked together to complete these events.

InvisiYouth Charity loves supporting disability sports and the way adaptive athletics can play such a critical role in the life of a teen and young adult living with chronic illness and disability.

It is a way to get them back into a routine, physical therapy, and teamwork mentality. It is a powerful force that needs more attention and support group to it!

Our teams consisted of lifelong friends, and competitive athletes in university, supporting their friend with a rare disease. Another team was filled with family members and siblings.

And we even had a married couple that are passionate physiotherapists and exercise therapists who want to work with InvisiYouth to train and bring adaptive sports to more older youth across England.

One InvisiYouth Team member, 21-year-old university student Katy Baker, felt the benefits of being part of Superhero Series Triathlon.

“[The Superhero Tri] proved that people like me, with chronic illness, can take part in sports with their family and friends,” said Baker. 

Watching our teams cross the finish line at the Superhero Triathlon was unlike anything we could have experienced. So much joy and excitement from accomplishing their goal, and watching all the other youth, families, friends and supporters crossing the finish line and earning their medal.

It is clear to say that anyone can get so motivated watching such a strong group of people competing in all types of sport!

Now…InvisiYouth Charity is happy to announce that we will also be part of the next Superhero Series event, the Winter WonderWheels on December 3rd at Dorney Lake once again!  This will be a massively festive disability adaptive sporting event where anyone can cycle, walk, run, push/be pushed around Dorney Lake for different distance challenges: 1km, 5km or 10km!

AND WE NEED YOU TO JOIN OUR TEAMS!

We want to have a full set of teams so if you want to compete with friends and family FOR FREE, contact us, and we will sign you up for a fun and festive event to end 2017! 

Spotlight Story Program: Shona Cobb’s Story

Meet Shona Cobb

Breaking the stigma-ceiling for chronic illness and disability comes to second nature to British 20 year old, Shona Cobb. She’s used her experience of life with Marfan Syndrome to empower others living with disabilities and illnesses, and change the way businesses, media and society treat disability. Shona uses her successful blog and speaking on TV and radio around England to bring change to disability rights, and as an InvisiYouth Global Brand Leader, Shona’s advocacy can reach an international stage. 

‘Is there a cure?’ is a response I get time and time again when explaining my rare condition to everyone from friends to strangers in the street. Perhaps if I were diagnosed as a teenager, or even an adult, the realization that there is no cure for my condition would have been a difficult one but knowing all my life that I have a genetic condition has given me a long time to come to terms with my prognosis.

Marfan Syndrome is the name of my primary condition, the starting point for all my secondary conditions. It’s a genetic connective tissue disorder, with my Mum having passed it on to me, and it can be visible quite far back in our family tree, with 2 family members dying from associated complications during my lifetime. A daunting aspect of this multi-systemic condition.

Long limbs are one sign of the condition and my unusually long arms and legs were visible on ultrasound scans while my Mum was still pregnant with me. Officially I was diagnosed as a toddler, when I started to meet more of the criteria, but my Mum knew that I had inherited Marfan a while before that.

For most of my childhood I was a happy, energetic child. I had hypermobile joints that I would show off to my classmates and I got ‘growing pains’ a lot more than my peers. Unpleasant but not unmanageable. It was as a teenager that more serious problems started appearing. I found myself missing more and more classes to attend hospital appointments, and the reality of my condition started to sink in. It wasn’t just something I happened to have anymore, it was affecting my daily life.

I was diagnosed with Scoliosis, a curve in my spine, at 13 years old and by 15 I was unable to climb the stairs at school, finding myself doing worksheets in the library instead of joining my classmates on the top floor of the main building.

It was isolating and really affected me because I loved education and learning, I thrived at school and worked hard. So, when I was booked in to have surgery to correct the curve with titanium rods and screws I was over the moon at the prospect of some relief from the back pain. I blogged about my experience, with my Mum keeping a diary of my first week in hospital, which proved to be a good idea as I barely remember that week. I even documented my experience with a complication post-surgery and finding out that I would need a second surgery. That was the beginning of me using my experiences to educate and support others, and it was also the start of my body beginning to crumble.

By 18 I’d had one hip replaced and the other being on its way to needing the same, a difficult thing to get your head round when joint replacements are so often associated with elderly people. I really thought that after my spinal surgery, I would return to life as normal. Then after my hip replacement, I was sure that was it, I’d surely endured enough. It was downhill from there though and now, at 20 years old, I’m a powerchair user with a large cyst at the bottom of my spine being my current issue.

It’s incredible how humans adapt, after every surgery I believed it was over, I believed I could not cope with anymore but again and again I proved myself wrong. Resilient, that ‘s what people would call me. I believe though that we all deal with the hand life gives us in whatever way we can, everyone has struggles and mine happen to be health related. Others deal with grief, violence, homelessness, the list goes on. I was determined to take the hand I’d been dealt and make the best of it.

It would take me all day to list everything I’ve been involved with in the past 2 years. I’ve used my blog and social media to raise awareness of Marfan Syndrome and educate people on disability issues. I’ve talked about how environmental movements can affect and exclude disabled people on the news. I’ve been involved with a national newspaper’s project to document the daily access problems I come across as a powerchair user. For someone who was painfully shy as a child, I’ve certainly come out of my shell, and that is all down to me having a chronic illness and being disabled. I feel I’ve found my calling in life. I’m not currently able to work but I can use my free time and my voice to help raise awareness and make real change.

I’ve helped local shops install ramps to improve access for disabled people and I’ve worked with organisations to improve their inclusivity. Charity work is something I’ve passionate about though, being the Marfan ambassador for The Hypermobility Syndromes Association (HMSA) and being the youngest person in a British Heart Foundation (BHF) patient advisory group. I’ve taken what life has given and done my best with it.

People often speak about disability and chronic illness as though it’s the worst thing, but I feel empowered by disability. I am proud to be a young disabled woman, I am proud of the change I’ve made and am trying to make in this world. Being disabled and chronically ill is a huge part of my identity, why shouldn’t I be proud of that?

I hope to inspire other disabled and chronically ill people to be empowered by their conditions too, as many other disabled activists and campaigners have done for me. I scroll through my Instagram feed and I feel empowered to see so many disabled people not being ashamed of their disability and embracing their bodies.

I’ve still many rocky roads ahead of me, including major open-heart surgery and potentially more risky spinal surgery, but I still look forward, looking back at the past, at a life that could have been, has never done me any favours. I’m looking forward now, looking forward to the change I can make in the world, looking forward to being more confident and looking forward to a time where disabled and chronically ill people can feel empowered by their disability without others telling us we shouldn’t.

I’m excited to fulfill these goals and support others, especially in my new role as a Global Brand Leader for InvisiYouth!

 

Spotlight Story Program: Rachel Mayo’s Story

Meet Rachel Mayo

As a university freshman, Rachel was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, and it changed her way of way. But Rachel decided to take her new diagnosis and not just better her life, but motivate others with T1D to do the same. And she’s been doing that across the United States ever since. Plus…we’re thrilled Rachel will keep working with InvisiYouth as 2018 continues.

I grew up full of energy, always going from one thing to the next, without a need to hit the “slow down” button.

As a freshman in college, when it started to require more and more energy to do basic things, like walk to class, sit through class, even, I began to worry a little. Why did I need a three-hour nap after my 50-minute English class, when just months before, I was fine getting only 50 minutes of sleep every night?

“Worried” probably isn’t even the right word. I just noticed the difference. Since my mom worked for a general physician, I decided to get a general check-up. I figured my hormones were just out of whack, and as soon as I was relieved of the stress of my semester and moved back home for the summer, I would return to normal.

It’s no surprise that was not the cure for whatever was wrong with me. (That would make for an awfully boring story, don’t you think?) The day after my last final of my freshman year, I went to the doctor, and was told that if what they suspected was right, that there was no cure for whatever was wrong with me.

The next day, at 7:15 am, I went to see an endocrinologist, they drew blood, and after several anxiety-filled minutes of waiting, It was confirmed. I had Type 1 Diabetes (T1D).

There is no cure.

I would have to take insulin for the rest of my life.

I was mostly shocked.

Not necessarily angry, but I was sad. Confused. Full of questions. But for the most part, I was okay.

Three days later, I was at the mall with my mom and sister, and we had put our shopping on hold to refuel. (Eat lunch.)

At the food court, over my chicken sandwich and the Diet Coke I was still trying to learn to love, I broke down. I’m talking crocodile tears pouring down my face. I had every emotion running through my veins at that moment and I felt completely out of control.

That’s when I decided that the best way for me to deal with this disease would be to help other people deal with this disease. I had no idea what that looked like at the time, as I still had no idea how to handle my diagnosis. But I knew I could tackle it, and I knew I wanted to use it to help others.

Fast forward and I know what that looks like now. I have spent the last year traveling and speaking to different groups with T1D around the world, helping them to navigate this disease with a positive spirit.

I use social media to share pictures and videos of my life with T1D. I share my victories, my frustrations, and try my hardest to let others with T1D know they are not alone in what they go through.

I also love to educate those without T1D about the difficulties of living with this disease. Since T1D is an invisible illness, it is easy for others to overlook the constant inner battle we fight every day.

While this disease does not define me, it is a very big part of me, and has helped shape me into the person I am today. And if I may be so frank, I really like the person I am today. The person I am today is brave, even when it’s frightening, is adventurous, even when it takes work, and is gracious, even with herself.

But it took work to get there. What has helped me the most is using my story to help others. It is so therapeutic to lay down all of my battle scars for others to see and realize that they have friends who are in the trenches with them.

The community of people I have surrounded myself with has been crucial. I love getting on twitter and conversing with my #DOC (Diabetes Online Community) friends.

It’s like walking into my own special little T1D world where everyone is willing to give you advice when you need it, or just let you vent when you don’t. It’s not weird when I say “my blood sugar got so low my tongue went numb” or “I got a unicorn today!”

My T1D community has truly been life changing for me.

I don’t want it to sound like I have it all figured out and I am completely okay. I’m not. I get burned out. I get angry. I cry so hard I start to hyperventilate.

But that is okay. I have permission to do that, and once I figured that out, it got easier for me to get through those times. It’s okay to feel those things! But it’s not a healthy spot to set up camp.

What I want, more than anything, is for people with chronic illnesses, to understand that they can do anything. Absolutely anything. And YES it might be difficult, but it is so very worth it.

This past year alone I went skydiving, ran a half-marathon, visited 24 states, and five countries including UAE, Mexico, and three countries in Africa.

“I could never do that,” is what I heard from many of my T1D friends after every new adventure. It breaks my heart every time I hear that.

YES YOU CAN! There’s a strategy for everything, and there is nothing this disease can prevent you from doing.

Find a community that lifts you up. Get rid of the negative people, words, and elements in your life. Take baby steps. Look at yourself in the mirror and tell yourself how brave you are. Tell yourself you can do anything. And if you still doubt yourself, find me, and I will tell you.

You can do anything. I believe in you.